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Home > News > Hamilton High School student conducts research on nanoparticles at ASU

February 15th, 2007

Hamilton High School student conducts research on nanoparticles at ASU

Sun screen — you can't live without it in the Southwest. But the very product that is protecting human skin from harmful solar rays could be wreaking havoc on the environment because of one ingredient.

Researchers at Arizona State University have been studying the impact of nanoparticles, such as titanium dioxide/oxide (TiO2), which is found in sunscreen and many other products, on aquatic organisms. With so much to study in the way of nanoparticles, they agreed to enlist the help of a rather curious high school student.

Jingyuan Luo, a Hamilton High School senior, volunteered her time during her junior year because of her love for research. "I wanted to do something that I did not have to do for a grade," said Luo. "I wanted to do it for me, because research is somewhat of a hobby for me."


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