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Home > News > Nanofilter suit for chemical warfare

October 11th, 2006

Nanofilter suit for chemical warfare

Higher efficiency was the bottom line and Dr. Ramkumar, who is an Assistant Professor at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Technology, turned to nanotechnology, his area of specialisation, for answers.

The micron to submicron size of the deadly chemicals used in chemical warfare, such as nerve agents, meant that the protective suit made of conventional high efficient particulate air (HEPA) filters were no good. "The HEPA filter can filter out particles greater than ten micron size," he noted, "so we had to produce filters of nano size."


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