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Home > News > Texas A&M Researchers Develop Nanotechnology To Detect Bacteria

February 28th, 2005

Texas A&M Researchers Develop Nanotechnology To Detect Bacteria

Abstract:
A group of Texas A&M University researchers have developed a novel nanotechnology to rapidly detect and identify bacteria.

The researchers call their technique SEnsing of Phage-Triggered Ion Cascade, or SEPTIC. Using a nanowell device with two antenna-like electrodes, the scientists can detect the electric-field fluctuations that result when a type of virus called a bacteriophage infects a specific bacterium, and then identify the bacterium present. The researchers tested their technology on strains of E. coli and experienced a 100 percent success rate in detecting and identifying the bacteria quickly and accurately.

Source:
Texas A&M

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