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Home > News > Self-assembling electronics

November 27th, 2003

Self-assembling electronics

Abstract:
Researchers in Israel have shown how molecular electronic devices made from carbon nanotubes can be precisely positioned and wired up on a silicon chip. The researchers use the principles of biological molecular recognition to guide the nanotubes into place. The work offers an answer to the big question that looms over molecular electronics: even if you can make individual devices from single molecules, how do you arrange them into complex circuits? (more on earlier article)

Source:
* Nature

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