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Home > Press > Oxford Instruments announces release of new dilution refrigerator - Proteox: Opening the door for a new direction in dilution refrigerator development

Abstract:
Unlock new applications, maximise system value and gain greater control over experimental set-up with the ProteoxTM system from Oxford Instruments. A new innovation from the pioneers in dilution refrigerator technology.

Oxford Instruments announces release of new dilution refrigerator - Proteox: Opening the door for a new direction in dilution refrigerator development

Abingdon, UK | Posted on February 28th, 2020

The ProteoxTM dilution refrigerator has been fully re-developed to provide an interchangeable, experimental unit that can support multiple users and a variety of experiments from a single experimental system. This is achieved by a side-loading ‘secondary insert’ module that allows samples, communications wiring and signal-conditioning components to be installed and changed whenever necessary.

“Our development team have recognised that to optimise for such a wide range of applications, adaptability needs to be designed in as the very foundation of the system," says Matt Martin, The Engineering Director at Oxford Instruments NanoScience. "This configurability allows us to offer more tailored solutions and experimental set-ups on standard lead times. It also provides our customers with maximised future-proofing against changing requirements in a dynamic research landscape", commented Matt.

Quantum applications are a key driving factor for cryogenic innovation, placing increasing demands on experimental volume and wiring capacity. The Proteox system addresses these market demands through increased line-of sight-access, wider plate spacings and a 50% increase in mixing chamber plate area.

Ease of use and ease of service are achieved through a fully redeveloped, web-based control system, providing remote connectivity and enhanced data visualisation capabilities. Further benefits in system control are gained through a patented gas-gap heat-switch system that can actively adjust the thermal conductivity between experimental plates.

This is the first release of a new family of Proteox dilution refrigerators that will all share the same modular layout to provide cross-compatibility and added flexibility for cryogenic installations.

Oxford Instruments will be presenting the new Proteox dilution refrigerator at the upcoming key Physics conferences, including APS March Meeting (Denver, CO, USA, 2-4 March) and the DPG March Meeting (Dresden, Germany,16-18 March).

More information can be found on the company Website at: nanoscience.oxinst.com/proteox

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Issued for and on behalf of Oxford Instruments NanoScience

####

About Oxford Instruments NanoScience
Oxford Instruments NanoScience designs, supplies and supports market-leading research tools that enable quantum technologies, new materials and device development in the physical sciences. Our tools support research down to the atomic scale through creation of high performance, cryogen-free low temperature and magnetic environments, based upon our core technologies in low and ultra-low temperatures, high magnetic fields and system integration, with ever-increasing levels of experimental and measurement readiness. Oxford Instruments NanoScience is a part of the Oxford Instruments plc group.



About Oxford Instruments plc

Oxford Instruments designs, supplies and supports high-technology tools and systems with a focus on research and industrial applications. Innovation has been the driving force behind Oxford Instruments' growth and success for 60 years, supporting its core purpose to address some of the world’s most pressing challenges.



The first technology business to be spun out from Oxford University, Oxford Instruments is now a global company and is listed on the FTSE250 index of the London Stock Exchange (OXIG). Its strategy focuses on being a customer-centric, market-focused Group, understanding the technical and commercial challenges faced by its customers. Key market segments include Semiconductor & Communications, Advanced Materials, Healthcare & Life Science, and Quantum Technology.



Their portfolio includes a range of core technologies in areas such as low temperature and high magnetic field environments; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; X-ray, electron, laser and optical based metrology; atomic force microscopy; optical imaging; and advanced growth, deposition and etching.



Oxford Instruments is helping enable a greener economy, increased connectivity, improved health and leaps in scientific understanding. Their advanced products and services allow the world’s leading industrial companies and scientific research communities to image, analyse and manipulate materials down to the atomic and molecular level, helping to accelerate R&D, increase manufacturing productivity and make ground-breaking discoveries.

Contacts:
Soma Deshprabhu

Marketing Communications Manager

Oxford Instruments NanoScience

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