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Home > Press > NC State Researcher Gets $1.4 Million Grant to Study Public Understanding of Nanotechnology Health Risks

Abstract:
In order to help people better understand emerging research on the safety of the tiny substances called nanoparticles, the National Science Foundation has awarded North Carolina State University's Dr. David Berube a $1.4 million grant to determine how the public absorbs scientific information on the emerging technology and other technical issues.

NC State Researcher Gets $1.4 Million Grant to Study Public Understanding of Nanotechnology Health Risks

Raleigh, NC | Posted on March 22nd, 2008

"When the public tries to understand technical information on health and safety, they do not turn to scientific data," Berube says, "but use their own preconceived ideas and biases" to determine what is safe - regardless of whether the science supports their conclusion. Berube says the grant will fund research into how people use these biases to determine whether something is safe. The goal is to develop a "recipe" that can be used by scientists to convey complicated research findings in a way that the public can understand.

Berube, a professor of communication, says that this four-year grant will focus on how the public interprets information about the potential health risks of nanotechnology. Berube notes that the study of how people understand such risks can be tricky because "a lot of this information is about life and death, and most people have trouble understanding the difference between a risk of 1 in 1 billion and a risk of 1 in 1,000."

As the emerging science of nanotechnology continues to expand, Berube says that it is becoming increasingly important to determine the best way of getting accurate information out to the public and to state and federal regulators - so that they can make informed decisions about what is and is not safe.

Nanotechnology is generally defined as technology that uses substances having a size of 100 nanometers or less (thousands of times thinner than a human hair), and is expected to have widespread uses in medicine, consumer products and industrial processes. For example, nanotechnology is already in use in a variety of products, including some brands of sunscreen and cosmetics.

Berube will be using the grant to hold a two-day conference, Communicating Risk in the 21st Century, in Raleigh this summer, and will also provide opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students at NC State to become involved in the research effort.

Berube is the author of Nanohype: Beyond the Nanotechnology Buzz, and teaches graduate courses in risk communication and rhetoric in science and technology in NC State's College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Berube joined the NC State faculty in January. This is his fifth National Science Foundation grant on public understanding of science.

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About North Carolina State University
With more than 31,000 students and nearly 8,000 faculty and staff, North Carolina State University is a comprehensive university known for its leadership in education and research, and globally recognized for its science, technology, engineering and mathematics leadership.

NC State students, faculty and staff are focused. As one of the leading land-grant institutions in the nation, NC State is committed to playing an active and vital role in improving the quality of life for the citizens of North Carolina, the nation and the world.

How? Researchers across the university and Centennial Campus —— are deeply engaged in making new, application-driven discoveries. As a major research university, NC State has the people —from undergraduate and graduate students to faculty — and the responsibility to advance knowledge, transfer technology, and discover and develop innovations that solve some of the world’s most pressing problems.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Dr. David Berube
(919) 515-9750


Matt Shipman
News Services
(919) 515-6386

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