Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing

The individual building blocks are heated on a silver surface in order to synthesize a porous graphene ribbon that exhibits semiconducting properties and a ladder-like structure. In each rung of the ladder, two carbon atoms have been replaced with nitrogen atoms (blue).

CREDIT
University of Basel, Department of Physics
The individual building blocks are heated on a silver surface in order to synthesize a porous graphene ribbon that exhibits semiconducting properties and a ladder-like structure. In each rung of the ladder, two carbon atoms have been replaced with nitrogen atoms (blue). CREDIT University of Basel, Department of Physics

Abstract:
Graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb structure. The material is of interest not only in basic research but also for various applications given to its unique properties, which include excellent electrical conductivity as well as astonishing strength and rigidity. Research teams around the world are working to further expand these characteristics by substituting carbon atoms in the crystal lattice with atoms of different elements. Moreover, the electric and magnetic properties can also be modified by the formation of pores in the lattice.

Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing

Basel, Switzerland | Posted on July 10th, 2020

Ladder-like structure

Now, a team of researchers led by the physicist Professor Ernst Meyer of the University of Basel and the chemist Dr. Shi-Xia Liu from the University of Bern have succeeded in producing the first graphene ribbons whose crystal lattice contains both periodic pores and a regular pattern of nitrogen atoms. The structure of this new material resembles a ladder, with each rung containing two atoms of nitrogen.

In order to synthesize these porous, nitrogen-containing graphene ribbons, the researchers heated the individual building blocks step by step on a silver surface in a vacuum. The ribbons are formed at temperatures up to 220°C. Atomic force microscopy allowed the researchers not only to monitor the individual steps in the synthesis, but also to confirm the perfect ladder structure - and stability - of the molecule.

Extraordinary properties

Using scanning tunneling microscopy, the scientists from the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute (SNI) at the University of Basel also demonstrated that these new graphene ribbons were no longer electrical conductors, like pure graphene, but actually behaved as semiconductors. Colleagues from the Universities of Bern and Warwick confirmed these findings by performing theoretical calculations of the electronic properties. "The semiconducting properties are essential for the potential applications in electronics, as their conductivity can be adjusted specifically," says Dr. Rémy Pawlak, first author of the study.

From the literature, it is known that a high concentration of nitrogen atoms in the crystal lattice causes graphene ribbons to magnetize when subjected to a magnetic field. "We expect these porous, nitrogen-doped graphene ribbons to display extraordinary magnetic properties," says Ernst Meyer. "In the future, the ribbons could therefore be of interest for applications in quantum computing."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ernst Meyer

41-612-073-724

@UniBasel_en

Copyright © University of Basel

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it January 15th, 2021

Graphene/ Graphite

New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it January 15th, 2021

Imaging

USTC develops ultrahigh-performance plasmonic metal-oxide materials January 11th, 2021

High-speed atomic force microscopy visualizes cell protein factories January 8th, 2021

JEOL Announces 2020 Microscopy Image Grand Prize Winners January 7th, 2021

New imaging method views soil carbon at near-atomic scales December 25th, 2020

Possible Futures

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers January 15th, 2021

Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation January 15th, 2021

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Chip Technology

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it January 15th, 2021

Engineers find antioxidants improve nanoscale visualization of polymers January 8th, 2021

Quantum Computing

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers January 15th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Stretching diamond for next-generation microelectronics January 5th, 2021

Microfabricated elastic diamonds improve material's electronic properties January 1st, 2021

Discoveries

Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Announcements

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Tools

USTC develops ultrahigh-performance plasmonic metal-oxide materials January 11th, 2021

High-speed atomic force microscopy visualizes cell protein factories January 8th, 2021

JEOL Announces 2020 Microscopy Image Grand Prize Winners January 7th, 2021

New imaging method views soil carbon at near-atomic scales December 25th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project