Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition

This is an artistic illustration of atomic layer deposition.

CREDIT
J. Luterbacher (EPFL)
This is an artistic illustration of atomic layer deposition. CREDIT J. Luterbacher (EPFL)

Abstract:
Atomic layer deposition (ALD) involves stacking layers of atoms on top of each other like pancakes. The atoms come from a vaporized material called a precursor. ASD is a well-established technique for manufacturing microelectronics like semiconductors and magnetic heads for sound recording, as well as sensors for bioengineering and diagnostics.

A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition

Lausanne, Switzerland | Posted on November 15th, 2019

However, using ALD for depositing layers on larger surfaces has been a struggle, especially when it comes to manufacturing materials that must be kept at low cost, e.g. catalysts and solar devices.

"The sticking point is not necessarily making the right material but making it cheaply," explains Professor Jeremy Luterbacher, head of EPFL's Laboratory of Sustainable and Catalytic Processing (LPDC). "Coating larger surface areas with gas-phase methods requires long deposition times, and huge excesses of precursor, both of which increase costs," adds Benjamin Le Monnier, the PhD student who performed most of the research.

Now, the LPDC has developed a solution. Using ALD in a liquid phase, the scientists can produce materials indistinguishable from those made in the gas phase, with far cheaper equipment and no excess precursors.

Greater precision cuts costs

The researchers achieved this breakthrough by carefully measuring the ratio of the reacting precursors before injecting them onto the surface of a substrate. This way, they used exactly the right amount of precursor, with no leftovers that can cause unwanted reactions or be wasted.

The new method also reduces costs by requiring only standard lab equipment for chemical synthesis. It can also be easily scaled up to coat more than 150 g of material with the same cheap equipment, without loss of coating quality. The technique can even achieve coatings that are not possible using gas-phase ALD, e.g. by using non-volatile precursors.

"We believe that this technique could greatly democratize the use ALD on catalysts and other high surface area materials," says Luterbacher.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Nik Papageorgiou

41-216-932-105

@EPFL_en

Copyright © Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Reference

Related News Press

News and information

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism August 3rd, 2020

New printing process advances 3D capabilities: Technology aims to improve quality of products used in business, industry and at home July 31st, 2020

TU Graz researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications July 31st, 2020

Scientists discover new class of semiconducting entropy-stabilized materials July 31st, 2020

2 Dimensional Materials

Physicists find misaligned carbon sheets yield unparalleled properties July 31st, 2020

Possible Futures

Physicists find misaligned carbon sheets yield unparalleled properties July 31st, 2020

Way, shape and form: Synthesis conditions define the nanostructure of manganese dioxide July 31st, 2020

New printing process advances 3D capabilities: Technology aims to improve quality of products used in business, industry and at home July 31st, 2020

Scientists discover new class of semiconducting entropy-stabilized materials July 31st, 2020

Chip Technology

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism August 3rd, 2020

TU Graz researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications July 31st, 2020

Scientists discover new class of semiconducting entropy-stabilized materials July 31st, 2020

Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing July 10th, 2020

Discoveries

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism August 3rd, 2020

Way, shape and form: Synthesis conditions define the nanostructure of manganese dioxide July 31st, 2020

New printing process advances 3D capabilities: Technology aims to improve quality of products used in business, industry and at home July 31st, 2020

TU Graz researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications July 31st, 2020

Announcements

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism August 3rd, 2020

New printing process advances 3D capabilities: Technology aims to improve quality of products used in business, industry and at home July 31st, 2020

TU Graz researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications July 31st, 2020

Scientists discover new class of semiconducting entropy-stabilized materials July 31st, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

When Dirac meets frustrated magnetism August 3rd, 2020

Way, shape and form: Synthesis conditions define the nanostructure of manganese dioxide July 31st, 2020

New printing process advances 3D capabilities: Technology aims to improve quality of products used in business, industry and at home July 31st, 2020

TU Graz researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications July 31st, 2020

Tools

Bruker Launches Revolutionary High-Speed AFM System for Single-Molecule Applications: JPK NanoRacer® Follows Molecular Dynamics in Real Time at 50 Frames per Second July 30th, 2020

Izon Science receives $10.5M investment from Bolton Equities: Christchurch-headquartered nanotech company secures investment to accelerate global growth; appoints top board chairman and directors July 28th, 2020

Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials: Experts call for global effort to clear hurdles to mass production July 27th, 2020

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse: Institute of Optics research sets record for shortest laser pulse for newly developed technology, work that has important applications in engineering and biomedicine July 24th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project