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Home > Press > New technology can detect hundreds of proteins in a single sample: Improvement of barcoding technique offers cost-effective alternative to current technology

Abstract:
New technology developed by a team of McGill University scientists shows potential to streamline the analysis of proteins, offering a quick, high volume and cost-effective tool to hospitals and research labs alike.

New technology can detect hundreds of proteins in a single sample: Improvement of barcoding technique offers cost-effective alternative to current technology

Montreal, Canada | Posted on August 13th, 2018

Proteins found in blood provide scientists and clinicians with key information on our health. These biological markers can determine if a chest pain is caused by a cardiac event or if a patient has cancer.

Unfortunately, the tools used to detect such proteins haven’t evolved much over the past 50 years – despite there being over 20,000 proteins in our body, the vast majority of protein tests run today target only a single protein at-a-time.

Now, PhD candidate Milad Dagher, Professor David Juncker and colleagues in McGill’s Department of Biomedical Engineering have devised a technique that can detect hundreds of proteins with a single blood sample.

Part of their work, just published in Nature Nanotechnology, describes a new and improved way to barcode micro-beads using multicolour fluorescent dyes. By generating upwards of 500 differently coloured micro-beads, their new barcoding platform enables detection of markers in parallel from the same solution—for example, a blue barcode can be used to detect marker 1, while a red barcode can detect marker 2, and so on. A laser-based instrument called a cytometer then counts the proteins that stick to the different coloured beads.

Though this kind of analysis method has been available for some time, interference among multicolour dyes has limited the ability to generate the right colours. Now, a new algorithm developed by the team enables different colours of micro-beads to be generated with high accuracy—much like a colour wheel can be used to predict the outcome of colour mixing.

Professor Juncker’s team is hoping to leverage its platform for improved analysis of proteins.

“Current technologies hold a major trade-off between the number of proteins that can be measured at once, and the cost and accuracy of a test”, Dagher explains. “This means that large-scale studies, such as clinical trials, are underpowered because they tend to fall back on tried-and-true platforms with limited capabilities.”

Their upcoming work focuses on maintaining accurate detection of proteins with increased scale.

Dagher and Jeffrey Munzar, a postdoctoral fellow in the Juncker lab, have teamed up with Professor Juncker and spun-off a company, nplex biosciences, to commercialize their new approach.

The McGill group was also recently awarded an NSERC Idea to Innovation grant to support the development of the next version of their technology platform.

The authors thank NSERC and FQRNT for funding. M.D. acknowledges the NSERC-CREATE ISS programme for support. The flow cytometry work was performed at two McGill core flow facilities, namely the Microbiology and Immunology (MIMM) department and the Life Science Complex, which is supported by funding from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation.

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Contacts:
Justin Dupuis

Media Relations

McGill University

Tel.: 514 398-6751





http://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/

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“Ensemble multicolour FRET model enables barcoding at extreme FRET levels” by Milad Dagher, Michael Kleinman, Andy Ng and David Juncker was published in Nature Nanotechnology

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