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Home > Press > Oxford Instruments announces Dr Kate Ross as winner of the 2018 Lee Osheroff Richardson Science Prize for North and South America

Abstract:
Oxford Instruments is delighted to announce the winner of the 2018 Lee Osheroff Richardson (LOR) Science Prize for North America as Dr Kate A. Ross, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics of Colorado State University, USA.

Oxford Instruments announces Dr Kate Ross as winner of the 2018 Lee Osheroff Richardson Science Prize for North and South America

Abingdon, UK | Posted on February 20th, 2018

Dr Ross is recognized for her research towards elucidation of exotic magnetic ground states and ground state selection in quantum frustrated magnets, using neutron scattering techniques at low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. The LOR Science Prize selection committee was very pleased to recognize the comprehensive nature of the studies led by a young scientist like Dr Ross, who is both very accomplished and also has had impact in the field of quantum and frustrated magnetism.

"It truly is an honour to be the recipient of this award. Exploring quantum magnetic phenomena in materials has been a difficult, exciting, and diverse subject. I am particularly lucky that I have had many great collaborators, and work within a supportive community. It’s a great honour to receive the Lee Osheroff Richardson Science Prize recognizing this work", commented Dr Ross.

Kate Ross has championed a remarkable body of experimental work that established what we know about a set of quantum frustrated pyrochlore magnets. During her PhD at McMaster University, she grew large single crystals of rare earth titanate pyrochlores, appropriate for neutron scattering measurements, and carried out sophisticated time-of-flight neutron scattering measurements at dilution refrigerator temperatures, and in magnetic fields up to 8 T. This single crystal, inelastic neutron scattering work, carried out from 2008 to 2012, was among the first to fully characterize a four dimensional data set of S(Q, E) (three Q dimensions, one energy dimension) to fit the high magnetic field spin excitation spectrum to linear spin wave theory.

Kate also played a key leadership role in both the experiments and the manipulation of the data sets in a program of neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements in very high, pulsed magnetic fields. These challenging experiments were carried out in a collaboration between the McMaster group and Hidenori Nojiri (Tohoku University), Garrett Granroth (ORNL) and Zahir Islam (ANL). The work resulted in two Phys. Rev. Letts. and instrument development papers and resulted in Kate giving two invited talks on the work.

Her topical body of work has attracted much international interest and significant recognitions. Five years past her PhD, she has 37 lifetime publications and an h-index of 21 (Google Scholar). She was awarded the 2017 George Valley Jr. Prize from the American Physical Society for outstanding early career contributions in any area of physics, the first female physicist to be recognized. Earlier, she was awarded the 2014 Alice Wilson Award from the Royal Society of Canada for early career excellence by a Canadian female scientist in any area of science. In 2016, Kate was appointed to a CIfAR Azrieli Global Scholar within the Quantum Materials Program.

The objective of the LOR Science Prize is to promote and recognise the novel work of young scientists working in the fields of low temperatures and/or high magnetic fields or surface science in North America. Oxford Instruments is aware that there is a critical and often difficult stage for many between completing a PhD and gaining a permanent research position. The company has therefore been helping individuals who are producing innovative work by offering assistance both financially and through promotion of their research work, through sponsoring the LOR Science Prize for North America for research in physical science. The Prize is named in honour of Professors David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff and the late Robert C. Richardson, joint recipients of The Nobel Prize in Physics 1996 "for their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3".

Dr Kate Ross will be presented with the LOR Science Prize at a special event “Socialize with Science” sponsored by Oxford Instruments, during the International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism, Davis, CA, USA in July 2018. The previous winners of the LOR Science Prize are Dr Christian Lupien, Dr Jason Petta, Dr Suchitra Sebastian, Dr Eunseong Kim, Dr Vivien Zapf, Dr Jing Xia, Dr Kenneth Burch, Dr Lu Li, and Dr Chiara Tarantini, Dr Cory Dean, Dr Mohammad Hamidian and Dr Brad Ramshaw.

More information on our all Science Prizes can be found at: www.oxford-instruments.com/scienceprize

- ends -


Issued for and on behalf of Oxford Instruments NanoScience.

####

About Oxford Instruments NanoScience
Oxford Instruments NanoScience designs, supplies and supports market-leading research tools that enable quantum technologies, new materials and device development in the physical sciences. Our tools support research down to the atomic scale through creation of high performance, cryogen free, low temperature and magnetic environments, based upon our core technologies in low and ultra-low temperatures, high magnetic fields and system integration, with ever-increasing levels of experimental and measurement readiness. Oxford Instruments NanoScience is a part of the Oxford Instruments plc group.

About Oxford Instruments plc

Oxford Instruments designs, supplies and supports high-technology tools and systems with a focus on research and industrial applications. Innovation has been the driving force behind Oxford Instruments' growth and success for over 50 years, and its strategy is to effect the successful commercialisation of these ideas by bringing them to market in a timely and customer-focused fashion.

The first technology business to be spun out from Oxford University, Oxford Instruments is now a global company and is listed on the London Stock Exchange (OXIG). Its objective is to be the leading provider of new generation tools and systems for the research and industrial sectors with a focus on nanotechnology. Its key market sectors include nano-fabrication and nano-materials. The company’s strategy is to expand the business into the life sciences arena, where nanotechnology and biotechnology intersect

This involves the combination of core technologies in areas such as low temperature, high magnetic field and ultra-high vacuum environments; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; X-ray, electron, laser and optical based metrology; atomic force microscopy; optical imaging; advanced growth, deposition and etching.

Oxford Instruments aims to pursue responsible development and deeper understanding of our world through science and technology. Its products, expertise, and ideas address global issues such as energy, environment, security and health.

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