Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Chemists strike nano-gold: 4 new atomic structures for gold nanoparticle clusters: Research builds upon work by Nobel Prize-winning team from Stanford University

Xiao Cheng Zeng, chemistry professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is shown with a model of a gold nano-cluster.
CREDIT: Craig Chandler/University Communications/University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Xiao Cheng Zeng, chemistry professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is shown with a model of a gold nano-cluster.

CREDIT: Craig Chandler/University Communications/University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Abstract:
Arranging gold, atomic staples and electron volts, chemists have drafted new nanoscale blueprints for low-energy structure capable of housing pharmaceuticals and oxygen atoms.

Chemists strike nano-gold: 4 new atomic structures for gold nanoparticle clusters: Research builds upon work by Nobel Prize-winning team from Stanford University

Lincoln, NE | Posted on April 28th, 2015

Led by University of Nebraska-Lincoln chemistry professor Xiao Cheng Zeng, and former UNL visiting professor Yi Gao, new research has revealed four atomic arrangements of a gold nanoparticle cluster. The arrangements exhibit much lower potential energy and greater stability than a standard-setting configuration reported last year by a Nobel Prize-winning team from Stanford University.

The modeling of these arrangements could inform the cluster's use as a transporter of pharmaceutical drugs and as a catalyst for removing pollutants from vehicular emissions or other industrial byproducts, Zeng said.

Zeng and his colleagues unveiled the arrangements for a molecule featuring 68 gold atoms and 32 pairs of bonded sulfur-hydrogen atoms. Sixteen of the gold atoms form the molecule's core; the remainder bond with the sulfur and hydrogen to form a protective coating that stems from the core.

Differences in atomic arrangements can alter molecular energy and stability, with less potential energy making for a more stable molecule. The team calculates that one of the arrangements may represent the most stable possible structure in a molecule with its composition.

"Our group has helped lead the front on nano-gold research over the past 10 years," said Zeng, an Ameritas University Professor of chemistry. "We've now found new coating structures of much lower energy, meaning they are closer to the reality than (previous) analyses. So the deciphering of this coating structure is major progress."

The researchers reported their findings in the April 24 edition of Science Advances, an online journal from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The structure of the molecule's gold core was previously detailed by the Stanford team. Building on this, Zeng and his colleagues used a computational framework dubbed "divide-and-protect" to configure potential arrangements of the remaining gold atoms and sulfur-hydrogen pairs surrounding the core.

The researchers already knew that the atomic coating features staple-shaped linkages of various lengths. They also knew the potential atomic composition of each short, medium and long staple -- such as the fact that a short staple consists of two sulfur atoms bonded with one gold.

By combining this information with their knowledge of how many atoms reside outside the core, the team reduced the number of potential arrangements from millions to mere hundreds.

"We divided 32 into the short, middle and long (permutations)," said Zeng, who helped develop the divide-and-protect approach in 2008. "We lined up all those possible arrangements, and then we computed their energies to find the most stable ones.

"Without those rules, it's like finding a needle in the Platte River. With them, it's like finding a needle in the fountain outside the Nebraska Union. It's still hard, but it's much more manageable. You have a much narrower range."

The researchers resorted to the computational approach because of the difficulty of capturing the structure via X-ray crystallography or single-particle transmission electron microscopy, two of the most common imaging methods at the atomic scale.

Knowing the nanoparticle's most stable configurations, Zeng said, could allow biomedical engineers to identify appropriate binding sites for drugs used to treat cancer and other diseases. The findings could also optimize the use of gold nanoparticles in catalyzing the oxidation process that transforms dangerous carbon monoxide emissions into the less noxious carbon dioxide, he said.

###

Zeng and Gao co-authored the study with Wen Wu Xu, who works with Gao at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. The team, which received support from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and UNL's Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, performed most of its computational analyses through the Holland Computing Center.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Xiao Cheng Zeng

402-472-9894

Copyright © University of Nebraska-Lincoln

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Download article:

Related News Press

News and information

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Laboratories

UC Irvine researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries: Team used super high-resolution microscopy enhanced by deep machine learning January 27th, 2023

New method addresses problem with perovskite solar cells: NREL researchers provide growth approach that boosts efficiency, stability December 29th, 2022

Chemistry

Researchers create a new 3D extra-large pore zeolite that opens a new path to the decontamination of water and gas: A team of scientists with the participation of the CSIC develops an extra-large pore silica zeolite from a silicate chain January 20th, 2023

Dual-site collaboration boosts electrochemical nitrogen reduction on Ru-S-C single-atom catalyst January 6th, 2023

Rapid fluorescent mapping of electrochemically induced local pH changes December 9th, 2022

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Department of Energy announces $9.1 million for research on quantum information science and nuclear physics: Projects span the development of quantum computing, algorithms, simulators, superconducting qubits, and quantum sensors for advancing nuclear physics January 27th, 2023

UC Irvine researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries: Team used super high-resolution microscopy enhanced by deep machine learning January 27th, 2023

Vertical electrochemical transistor pushes wearable electronics forward: Biomedical sensing is one application of efficient, low-cost transistors January 20th, 2023

Nanomedicine

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice: UW researchers have found a way to move gene therapies through the blood-brain barrier, a crucial step for brain-wide CRISPR treatments of disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease January 20th, 2023

Team undertakes study of two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenides Important biomedical application, including biosensing December 9th, 2022

SLAC/Stanford researchers discover how a nano-chamber in the cell directs protein folding: The results challenge a 70-year-old theory of how proteins fold in our cells and have profound implications for treating diseases linked to protein misfolding December 9th, 2022

Discoveries

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Announcements

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Department of Energy announces $9.1 million for research on quantum information science and nuclear physics: Projects span the development of quantum computing, algorithms, simulators, superconducting qubits, and quantum sensors for advancing nuclear physics January 27th, 2023

Military

Vertical electrochemical transistor pushes wearable electronics forward: Biomedical sensing is one application of efficient, low-cost transistors January 20th, 2023

New quantum computing architecture could be used to connect large-scale devices: Researchers have demonstrated directional photon emission, the first step toward extensible quantum interconnects January 6th, 2023

Computational system streamlines the design of fluidic devices: This computational tool can generate an optimal design for a complex fluidic device such as a combustion engine or a hydraulic pump December 9th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

Environment

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

This new fabric coating could drastically reduce microplastic pollution from washing clothes: University of Toronto Engineering researchers are working on a fabric finish to prevent microplastic fibres from shedding during laundry cycles January 27th, 2023

Researchers create a new 3D extra-large pore zeolite that opens a new path to the decontamination of water and gas: A team of scientists with the participation of the CSIC develops an extra-large pore silica zeolite from a silicate chain January 20th, 2023

New nanowire sensors are the next step in the Internet of Things January 6th, 2023

Automotive/Transportation

UC Irvine researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries: Team used super high-resolution microscopy enhanced by deep machine learning January 27th, 2023

New nanowire sensors are the next step in the Internet of Things January 6th, 2023

NYU Tandon researchers explore a more frictionless future: Elisa Riedo’s and her lab team’s discovery of a fundamental law of friction leads to new materials that can minimize energy loss November 4th, 2022

Scientists count electric charges in a single catalyst nanoparticle down to the electron: Tenfold improvement in the sensitivity of electron holography reveals the net charge in a single platinum nanoparticle with a precision of just one electron, providing fundamental informatio October 14th, 2022

Industrial

Boron nitride nanotube fibers get real: Rice lab creates first heat-tolerant, stable fibers from wet-spinning process June 24th, 2022

Nanotubes: a promising solution for advanced rubber cables with 60% less conductive filler June 1st, 2022

Protective equipment with graphene nanotubes meets the strictest ESD safety standards March 25th, 2022

OCSiAl receives the green light for Luxembourg graphene nanotube facility project to power the next generation of electric vehicles in Europe March 4th, 2022

Research partnerships

Polymer p-doping improves perovskite solar cell stability January 20th, 2023

SLAC/Stanford researchers discover how a nano-chamber in the cell directs protein folding: The results challenge a 70-year-old theory of how proteins fold in our cells and have profound implications for treating diseases linked to protein misfolding December 9th, 2022

New insights into energy loss open doors for one up-and-coming solar tech November 18th, 2022

New hybrid structures could pave the way to more stable quantum computers: Study shows that merging a topological insulator with a monolayer superconductor could support theorized topological superconductivity October 28th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project