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Home > Press > Check out the assembly line of the future!: NSF's Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing proves good test bed for large-scale nanomanufacturing designs

“Made to order,” a phrase that began with the service industry, is now vital to manufacturing's future. Manufacturing production has recently grown at its fastest pace in more than a decade, creating more economic value per dollar spent than any other sector. Adding to this surge is customization--the ability to quickly and efficiently make what you want when you want it. Rapid, efficient customization is becoming a reality for high-tech engineers, students and "maker" enthusiasts. Explore the remarkable advances that may transform manufacturing forever in this Special report.

Credit: NBC Learn, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and National Science Foundation
“Made to order,” a phrase that began with the service industry, is now vital to manufacturing's future. Manufacturing production has recently grown at its fastest pace in more than a decade, creating more economic value per dollar spent than any other sector. Adding to this surge is customization--the ability to quickly and efficiently make what you want when you want it. Rapid, efficient customization is becoming a reality for high-tech engineers, students and "maker" enthusiasts. Explore the remarkable advances that may transform manufacturing forever in this Special report.

Credit: NBC Learn, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and National Science Foundation

Abstract:
There's no shortage of ideas about how to use nanotechnology, but one of the major hurdles is how to manufacture some of the new products on a large scale. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst chemical engineer Jim Watkins and his team are working to make nanotechnology more practical for industrial-scale manufacturing.

Check out the assembly line of the future!: NSF's Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing proves good test bed for large-scale nanomanufacturing designs

Arlington, VA | Posted on May 20th, 2014

One of the projects they're working on at the NSF Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CHM) is a roll-to-roll process for nanotechnology that is similar to what is used in traditional manufacturing. They're also designing a process to manufacture printable coatings that improve the way solar panels absorb and direct light. They're even investigating the use of self-assembling nanoscale products that could have applications for many industries.

"New nanotechnologies can't impact the U.S. economy until practical methods are available for producing products, using them in high volumes, at low cost. CHM is researching the fundamental scientific and engineering barriers that impede such commercialization, and innovating new technologies to surmount those barriers," notes Bruce Kramer, senior advisor in the NSF Engineering Directorate's Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI), which funded the research.

"The NSF Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing is developing platform technologies for the economical manufacture of next generation devices and systems for applications in computing, electronics, energy conversion, resource conservation and human health," explains Khershed Cooper, a CMMI program director.

"The center creates fabrication tools that are enabling versatile and high-rate continuous processes for the manufacture of nanostructures that are systematically integrated into higher order structures using bottom-up and top-down techniques," Cooper says. "For example, CHM is designing and building continuous, roll-to-roll nanofabrication systems that can print, in high-volume, 3-D nanostructures and multi-layer nanodevices at sub-100 nanometer resolution, and in the process, realize hybrid electronic-optical-mechanical nanosystems."

The research in this episode was supported by NSF award #1025020, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Centers (NSEC): Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing.

Miles O'Brien, Science Nation Correspondent
Ann Kellan, Science Nation Producer

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