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Home > Press > Coupled carbon and peptide nanotubes achieved for the first time: twins nanotubes

Abstract:
CIQUS researchers (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela) obtained hybrid structures with complementary properties of nanotubes and self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

Coupled carbon and peptide nanotubes achieved for the first time: twins nanotubes

Santiago, Spain | Posted on March 1st, 2014

This work, led by CIQUS researchers Juan Granja and Javier Montenegro, describes the production of a hybrid structures composed of carbon nanotube single-walled (SWCNTs) and self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs), that can be applied in various areas biology or nanotechnology.

The results have been published in the prestigious Journal of the American Chemical Society, highlighting the complementary and synergistic properties derived from each type of nantotuboestructure.

For one side, the biocompatible nature of the peptide nanotubes would improve, among others, the adaptability of the carbon nanotubes in physiological conditions. Furthermore, the system and the complementary electrical properties are of interest for the preparation of nanometric and electronic devices free of short circuits.

Cyclic peptides self-assemble via hydrogen bonding, forming stacked tubular nanotubes, with complete control of diameter and functionalization.

Thus, by the logic design of cyclic peptide rings, it has been achieved the solubilization of carbon nanotubes in aqueous medium and, reciprocally, the carbon nanotubes increase the chances that the peptide rings interact with each other in a solvent that competes for links hydrogen as water.

The deposition of these nanoscale and complementary structures on different surfaces allows the formation of twin nanotubes having synergistic properties derived from each individual and complementary structure. Thus, for example, the formation of organized networks of peptide nanotubes on surfaces allows the alignment of the carbon nanotubes on a common axis.

Characterization by atomic force microscopy confirms hybrid different electrical properties of each nanotube (peptide: insulator; carbon: conductor) and allows the obtaining of similar insulating coated wire and hybrid nanometer-sized tubes.

Coupling of Carbon and Peptide Nanotubes. J. Montenegro, C. Vázquez-Vázquez, A. Kalinin, K. E. Geckeler, J. R. Granja.

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For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Fernando Casal
R&D Management

Singular Research Centers Network
Center for Research in Biological Chemistry and Molecular Materials (CIQUS)
Universidade de Santiago de CompostelaCIQUS - C/ Jenaro de la Fuente s/n
15782 Santiago de Compostela - España
Tel. (+34) 881 815 782
(+34) 600 942 443

Copyright © CIQUS

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Research Group: Juan Granja

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