Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Making a common cosmetic and sunblock ingredient safer

Using a particular type of titanium dioxide in sunblock and cosmetics could reduce the potential health risks associated with the widely used compound.
Credit: Hemera/Thinkstock
Using a particular type of titanium dioxide in sunblock and cosmetics could reduce the potential health risks associated with the widely used compound.

Credit: Hemera/Thinkstock

Abstract:
Using a particular type of titanium dioxide — a common ingredient in cosmetics, food products, toothpaste and sunscreen — could reduce the potential health risks associated with the widely used compound. The report on the substance, produced by the millions of tons every year for the global market, appears in the ACS journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

Making a common cosmetic and sunblock ingredient safer

Washington, DC | Posted on September 25th, 2013

Francesco Turci and colleagues explain that titanium dioxide (TiO2) is generally considered a safe ingredient in commercially available skin products because it doesn't penetrate healthy skin. But there's a catch. Research has shown that TiO2 can cause potentially toxic effects when exposed to ultraviolet light, which is in the sun's rays and is the same kind of light that the compound is supposed to offer protection against. To design a safer TiO2 for human use, the researchers set out to test different forms of the compound, each with its own architecture.

They tested titanium dioxide powders on pig skin (which often substitutes for human skin in these kinds of tests) with indoor lighting, which has very little ultraviolet light in it. They discovered that one of the two most commonly used crystalline forms of TiO2, called rutile, easily washes off and has little effect on skin. Anatase, the other commonly used form, however, was difficult to wash off and damaged the outermost layer of skin — even in low ultraviolet light. It appears to do so via "free radicals," which are associated with skin aging. "The present findings strongly encourage the use of the less reactive, negatively charged rutile to produce safer TiO2-based cosmetic and pharmaceutical products," the researchers conclude.

The authors acknowledge funding from Regione Piemonte.

####

About American Chemical Society
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact .

Follow us: Twitter Facebook

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael Bernstein

202-872-6042

Francesco Turci, Ph.D.
University of Torino, Chemistry Department
“G. Scansetti” Interdepartmental Center and NIS Excellence Center
via P. Giuria 7
10125 Torino
Italy

Copyright © American Chemical Society

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

DOWNLOAD FULL-TEXT ARTICLE - “Crystalline Phase Modulates the Potency of Nanometric TiO2 to Adhere and Perturb the Stratum Corneum of Porcine Skin under Indoor Light”

Related News Press

News and information

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Rice's Stephan Link honored for nanoscience research: The Welch Foundation honors ‘rising star’ with $100,000 Hackerman Award February 26th, 2015

Indefinite Life Extension Activists Organize Online Demonstration February 26th, 2015

Renishaw and Bruker team up for a workshop on TERS and co-localised AFM Raman February 26th, 2015

Discoveries

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Real-time observation of bond formation by using femtosecond X-ray liquidography February 26th, 2015

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy: University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells February 26th, 2015

Simple, Cost-Efficient Method Used to Determine Toxicants Growing in Pistachio February 26th, 2015

Announcements

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Real-time observation of bond formation by using femtosecond X-ray liquidography February 26th, 2015

Bruker-Sponsored Sixth AFM BioMed Conference Highlights Increasing Impact of AFM in Biological Applications February 26th, 2015

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy: University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells February 26th, 2015

Personal Care

Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life August 20th, 2014

AQUANOVA receives Technology Leadership Award 2014 FROST & SULLIVAN honors NovaSOL® Technology again August 12th, 2014

Nanotechnology used in sunscreens: a Mexican achievement May 14th, 2014

Production of Nanocapsule from Sea-Buckthorn Extract in Iran May 3rd, 2014

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Potential toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals examined in Industrial Biotechnology journal February 19th, 2015

A breakthrough in nanotoxicology by INRS researchers: Silver nanoparticles and inflammation February 18th, 2015

“Nanorama Laboratory“: Free Tool on Safe Handling of Nanomaterials Now Available in English! February 4th, 2015

Worms lead way to test nanoparticle toxicity: Rice University study validates low-cost, high-throughput technology February 2nd, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE