Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Next-generation transistor outperforms other carbon-based designs

Chongwu Zhou, corresponding author of a paper about the transistor that was published online by ACS Nano
Chongwu Zhou, corresponding author of a paper about the transistor that was published online by ACS Nano

Abstract:
A team of engineers from USC has constructed the highest-performing carbon nanotube transistor to date.

Next-generation transistor outperforms other carbon-based designs

Los Angeles, CA | Posted on May 7th, 2013

Next-generation transistor outperforms other carbon-based designs

By Robert Perkins
May 7, 2013

A team of engineers from USC has constructed the highest-performing carbon nanotube transistor to date.

Transistors are semiconductor switches and amplifiers that are key components of almost all electronic devices, from radios to cellphones to computers.

The new carbon nanotube transistor has an extrinsic performance — the limit of its practical, usable operating frequency — of 25 Gigahertz (GHz). By comparison, its closest competitor, built by the Institut d'Électronique de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, peaks at 15 GHz.

"Carbon nanotubes have unique properties and great potential in advanced electronic application," said Chongwu Zhou, professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and corresponding author of a paper about the transistor that was published online by ACS Nano on April 16. "This is the very first report of analog circuits based on self-aligned nanotube array transistors operated in the gigahertz regime.

"The characterization of nanotube transistor-based analog circuits is of great importance for further exploring the potential of nanotubes in high-frequency applications with fast speed and low-power consumption requirement," he added.

Zhou led a team that included USC PhD students Yuchi Che, Yuncheng Lin and Pyo Jae Kim.

The new transistor takes advantage of a new T-shaped design that is a mere 200 nanometers wide. The design helps reduce parasitic effects on the transistor's performance and boosts the speed of the transistor's response by scaling down its channel length. Zhou and his team recently patented the design.

Scientists have long eyed carbon nanotubes as a replacement for silicon semiconductors in commercial electronics because carbon has superior electrical properties and can be used to build smaller transistors.

Though current carbon nanotube-based designs come nowhere near the older silicon technology — which can perform at around 500 GHz — they have the potential, theoretically, to reach 1,000 GHz frequency performance.

"It is a significant step toward the practical application of carbon nanotube RF transistor as a promising candidate for next-generation electronics," said Che, lead author of the ACS Nano paper.

Zhou and his research group continue to work on optimizing carbon nanotube-based analog electronics. Their final goal is to generate carbon nanotube transistors and circuits that offer superior performance to traditional industrial technology.

This research as funded by the Joint KACST/California Center of Excellence and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Robert Perkins
(213) 740-9226

Copyright © University of Southern California

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Physicists precisely measure interaction between atoms and carbon surfaces May 28th, 2015

Linking superconductivity and structure May 28th, 2015

Chemists discover key reaction mechanism behind the highly touted sodium-oxygen battery May 28th, 2015

Chip Technology

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

New chip makes testing for antibiotic-resistant bacteria faster, easier: Researchers at the University of Toronto design diagnostic chip to reduce testing time from days to one hour, allowing doctors to pick the right antibiotic the first time May 28th, 2015

Collaboration could lead to biodegradable computer chips May 28th, 2015

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Global Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) Market Expected To Reach USD 3.42 Billion By 2022 May 29th, 2015

SouthWest NanoTechnologies Introduces AgeNT™ Transparent Conductor System at SID Display Week, Booth #543 May 28th, 2015

Physicists precisely measure interaction between atoms and carbon surfaces May 28th, 2015

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

Discoveries

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

New technique speeds nanoMRI imaging: Multiplexing technique for nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging developed by researchers in Switzerland cuts normal scan time from two weeks to two days May 28th, 2015

Announcements

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Stanford breakthrough heralds super-efficient light-based computers: Light can transmit more data while consuming far less power than electricity, and an engineering feat brings optical data transport closer to replacing wires May 29th, 2015

Donuts, math, and superdense teleportation of quantum information May 29th, 2015

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Global Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) Market Expected To Reach USD 3.42 Billion By 2022 May 29th, 2015

Military

OSU researchers prove magnetism can control heat, sound: Team leverages OSC services to help confirm, interpret experimental findings May 29th, 2015

Linking superconductivity and structure May 28th, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

New Antibacterial Wound Dressing in Iran Can Display Replacement Time May 22nd, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project