Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Electrical signals dictate optical properties

Abstract:
Researchers at the University of Southampton's Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) have created an artificial material, a metamaterial, with optical properties that can be controlled by electric signals.

Electrical signals dictate optical properties

Southampton, UK | Posted on March 19th, 2013

Photonic metamaterials are artificial materials created by precise and extremely fine structuring of conventional media using nanotechnology. They offer numerous new applications from cloaking to radically improved solar cells. However, the properties of metamaterials are usually fixed.

Dr Eric Plum, Research Lecturer at the ORC, explains: "We have found a fast and reliable way of coordinating the motion of thousands of metamaterial building blocks. We shift them by distances smaller than the diameter of a human hair. These minute rearrangements are sufficient to radically change the transmission and reflection characteristics of the metamaterial. We do this by engaging the same force that sticks a small piece of paper to a comb after brushing. In essence, we dictate the movement of metamaterial building blocks with electrical signals, and we can do this very fast."

Seen as an enabling technology of the future, metamaterials research has grown rapidly in the past decade. The University's Centre for Photonic Metamaterials is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and is at the forefront of this development. Director of the Centre Professor Nikolay Zheludev says: "Thanks to nanotechnology we need not depend only on natural materials; we can now engineer optical properties and change them at will. Light-enabled technologies are vital to the 21st century and photonic metamaterials will have a broad impact."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Glenn Harris

44-023-805-93212

Copyright © University of Southampton

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

This work is now published in Nature Nanotechnology. To read the full article visit:

For an overview of metamaterials research at the University of Southampton see:

Related News Press

News and information

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials April 19th, 2019

A hole in one for holographic display: Tiny pinholes in a thin film could pave the way for more widespread applications for 3D holographic displays April 19th, 2019

New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics April 19th, 2019

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine: Researchers at Osaka University meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens April 19th, 2019

Discoveries

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials April 19th, 2019

A hole in one for holographic display: Tiny pinholes in a thin film could pave the way for more widespread applications for 3D holographic displays April 19th, 2019

New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics April 19th, 2019

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine: Researchers at Osaka University meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens April 19th, 2019

Materials/Metamaterials

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials April 19th, 2019

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine: Researchers at Osaka University meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens April 19th, 2019

NEXUS 2019: Global Summit on Energy Materials and Green Nanotechnology April 16th, 2019

Mystery of negative capacitance in perovskite solar cells solved April 5th, 2019

Announcements

A hole in one for holographic display: Tiny pinholes in a thin film could pave the way for more widespread applications for 3D holographic displays April 19th, 2019

New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics April 19th, 2019

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine: Researchers at Osaka University meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens April 19th, 2019

From 2D to 1D: Atomically quasi '1D' wires using a carbon nanotube template: New bulk synthesis method for nanowires of molybdenum telluride for nanoelectronics April 19th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

A hole in one for holographic display: Tiny pinholes in a thin film could pave the way for more widespread applications for 3D holographic displays April 19th, 2019

New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics April 19th, 2019

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine: Researchers at Osaka University meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens April 19th, 2019

From 2D to 1D: Atomically quasi '1D' wires using a carbon nanotube template: New bulk synthesis method for nanowires of molybdenum telluride for nanoelectronics April 19th, 2019

Military

2D borophene gets a closer look: Rice, Northwestern find new ways to image, characterize unique material April 11th, 2019

Odd reaction creates a stir in the lab: Rice University researchers find using certain stir bars can create laboratory errors March 29th, 2019

Chemicals induce dipoles to damp plasmons: Rice University-led study finds molecules alter gold nanoparticles' electronic properties March 22nd, 2019

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

Energy

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials April 19th, 2019

NEXUS 2019: Global Summit on Energy Materials and Green Nanotechnology April 16th, 2019

New hybrid energy method could fuel the future of rockets, spacecraft for exploration: Nontraditional route shown to increase performance, burn rate April 9th, 2019

Mystery of negative capacitance in perovskite solar cells solved April 5th, 2019

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

2D borophene gets a closer look: Rice, Northwestern find new ways to image, characterize unique material April 11th, 2019

New hybrid energy method could fuel the future of rockets, spacecraft for exploration: Nontraditional route shown to increase performance, burn rate April 9th, 2019

Nanoscribe is Technology Partner of the Research Project MiLiQuant: 3D microfabrication meets quantum technology - Miniaturized light sources for industrial use in the fields of quantum sensor technology and quantum imaging April 1st, 2019

Tiny optical elements could one day replace traditional refractive lenses: High-resolution imaging applications include wide-angle cameras, miniature endoscopes March 28th, 2019

Solar/Photovoltaic

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials April 19th, 2019

Mystery of negative capacitance in perovskite solar cells solved April 5th, 2019

Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics: Efficient cathode interlayers made of ionene polymers refined with pendant fullerenes March 29th, 2019

A Research Hat-Trick: Mechanical engineering professor Bolin Liao receives third early-career award since September March 26th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project