Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > NSF grant to fund instrumentation for IU Nanoscale Characterization Facility

From left, Liang-shi Li, Steven Tait, Dongwhan Lee, Amar Flood, Sara Skrabalak, David Bish and David Baxter. Not pictured, Lyudmila Bronstein.
From left, Liang-shi Li, Steven Tait, Dongwhan Lee, Amar Flood, Sara Skrabalak, David Bish and David Baxter. Not pictured, Lyudmila Bronstein.

Abstract:
The National Science Foundation has awarded $776,114 to Indiana University Bloomington researchers to acquire instrumentation for investigating how the nanoscale structure and composition of surfaces give rise to the unique properties of materials.

NSF grant to fund instrumentation for IU Nanoscale Characterization Facility

Bloomington, IN | Posted on October 11th, 2011

The three-year grant, from the NSF Division of Materials Research, supports the purchase of an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, to be located at the Chemistry Building or Simon Hall and available for use by faculty members, scientists and graduate students from across campus. The researchers awarded the grant are all affiliated with the Nanoscale Characterization Facility at IU Bloomington and the instrumentation will be included as part of this user facility.

"This is state-of-the-art technology for elucidating the chemical state of surfaces and for understanding molecular interactions with surfaces," said Sara Skrabalak, principal investigator for the grant and an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry. "It will help answer questions related to the understanding and development of materials for solar energy, chemical sensing and other technologies, as well as addressing fundamental questions about materials found in nature."

Other researchers involved in the grant include co-principal investigators Lyudmila Bronstein, Dongwhan Lee, Liang-shi Li and Steven Tait and fellow investigators David Baxter, David Bish and Amar Flood. Lee and Flood are associate professors, Li and Tait are assistant professors and Bronstein is a senior scientist, all in the Department of Chemistry. Baxter is a professor in the Department of Physics and Bish is the Haydn Murray Chair in the Department of Geological Sciences.

Funding to supplement the grant comes from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research.

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the elemental composition and chemical and electronic states of surfaces by irradiating a material with a beam of X-rays and measuring the energy and electrons that escape. The XPS instrument will also be equipped for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which together can provide a more complete representation of the electronic structure of surfaces.

Researchers expect the equipment to be installed at IU and ready for use by the fall of 2012.

Skrabalak said having the instrumentation available in Bloomington will complement the existing instrumentation housed in the Nanoscale Characterization Facility and help to elevate the NCF to a world-class research center. The facility is part of the IU Bloomington Nanoscience Center.

Until now, researchers have had to send samples to other campuses for experiments involving XPS. Once the instrument is on line, it will increase the speed of research, allow "proof of concept" experiments to make the case for funding, and enable graduate students to be more accountable for their results as a result of having carried out all the research steps themselves.

The instrumentation has the potential to open new lines of research inquiry for the principal investigators and increase collaboration among scientific disciplines at IU Bloomington. It also will contribute to the public outreach mission of the Nanocience Center, which partners with regional academic and research institutions, businesses, K-12 schools and campus organizations.

Nanoscience is concerned with the unique properties of materials with dimensions of less than about one millionth of a meter. Understanding and measuring fundamental phenomena associated with such materials is essential to advancing many areas of modern science, including energy production, environmental remediation and biomedical and information technology.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Steve Hinnefeld
University Communications
812-856-3488


Jocelyn Bowie
College of Arts and Sciences
812-855-5265

Copyright © Indiana University Bloomington

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

'Stealth' nanoparticles could improve cancer vaccines October 1st, 2014

Stressed Out: Research Sheds New Light on Why Rechargeable Batteries Fail October 1st, 2014

New Absorber Will Lead to Better Biosensor: Biosensors are more sensitive and able to detect smaller changes in the environment October 1st, 2014

Graphene chips are close to significant commercialization October 1st, 2014

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal: Rice University's cheap hybrid outperforms rare metal as fuel-cell catalyst October 1st, 2014

$18-million NSF investment aims to take flat materials to new heights: 2-D alternatives to graphene may enable exciting advances in electronics, photonics, sensors and other applications October 1st, 2014

Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom October 1st, 2014

'Stealth' nanoparticles could improve cancer vaccines October 1st, 2014

Academic/Education

Yale University and Leica Microsystems Partner to Establish Microscopy Center of Excellence: Yale Welcomes Scientists to Participate in Core Facility Opening and Super- Resolution Workshops October 20 Through 31, 2014 September 30th, 2014

Rice launches Center for Quantum Materials: RCQM will immerse global visitors in cross-disciplinary research September 30th, 2014

Biosensors Get a Boost from Graphene Partnership: $5 Million Investment Supports Dozens of Jobs and Development of 300mm Fabrication Process and Wafer Transfer Facility September 18th, 2014

Malvern technology delivers Malvern reliability in multi-disciplinary lab at Queen Mary University London September 9th, 2014

Announcements

'Stealth' nanoparticles could improve cancer vaccines October 1st, 2014

Stressed Out: Research Sheds New Light on Why Rechargeable Batteries Fail October 1st, 2014

New Absorber Will Lead to Better Biosensor: Biosensors are more sensitive and able to detect smaller changes in the environment October 1st, 2014

Graphene chips are close to significant commercialization October 1st, 2014

Tools

Breakthrough in ALD-graphene by Picosun technology October 1st, 2014

Novel approach to magnetic measurements atom-by-atom October 1st, 2014

Stressed Out: Research Sheds New Light on Why Rechargeable Batteries Fail October 1st, 2014

Yale University and Leica Microsystems Partner to Establish Microscopy Center of Excellence: Yale Welcomes Scientists to Participate in Core Facility Opening and Super- Resolution Workshops October 20 Through 31, 2014 September 30th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE