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Home > News > Tiny Technologies Promise Powerful Protection: U.S. Army institute researches nanosciences for soldier safety

June 5th, 2011

Tiny Technologies Promise Powerful Protection: U.S. Army institute researches nanosciences for soldier safety

Abstract:
Today's dismounted infantry soldier often packs more than 140 pounds and still has incomplete ballistic protection, insufficient defense against chemical and biological weapons, and too many pieces of equipment that do not work well together, according to officials at the U.S. Army Research Office's Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies. Reducing the cumbersome weight that soldiers lug around on the battlefield is a major priority for the Army, which is intent on transforming itself into a lighter, more flexible 21st century force. Research being conducted at the institute one day could help transform current combat fatigues and bulky equipment into a do-it-all battle uniform that not only is lightweight but also provides many other benefits.

Basic research conducted at the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN), which is housed within the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), is designed to develop and exploit nanotechnology to improve soldier survivability dramatically. The ultimate goal is to help the Army create a 21st century battlesuit that combines high-technology capabilities with light weight and comfort. Army officials envision a thin, bullet-resistant uniform that monitors health, eases injuries, communicates automatically, and reacts instantly to chemical and biological agents. The multipurpose battle uniform is a long-range vision for how fundamental nanoscience might make soldiers less vulnerable to an array of threats, whether from the enemy or the environment.

Source:
afcea.org

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