Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > A hidden magnetic configuration in manganite thin films

Preparing samples for study at the NSLS.
Preparing samples for study at the NSLS.

Abstract:
Complex oxide materials are intriguing because their properties span an enormous range of distinct physical states, including conductors, insulators, superconductors, ferromagnets, anti-ferromagnets, ferro-electrics, piezo electrics, and multiferroics. Part of the attraction of these materials is that their properties can be modified by introducing a mixed valence state — that is, a composition that includes metal ions with more than one oxidation state.

A hidden magnetic configuration in manganite thin films

Upton, NY | Posted on February 8th, 2011

Scientists from DOE's Brookhaven and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, SLAC National Accelerator Center, and collaborators at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the UK are taking a closer look at one such material with a particular composition of lanthanum strontium and magnesium oxide.

La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) is a mixed-valence, complex oxide (containing a mix of Mn3+ and Mn4+ ions) whose properties have been examined extensively. LSMO is thought to be a simple metallic ferromagnet and it has been used in prototype, thin-film electrical devices (such as magneto-resistance junctions) that seek to exploit the many intriguing properties of complex oxides for new applications.

To further explore LSMO, the scientists grew single-layer films with a variable number of unit cells epitaxially on strontium titanate (STO). Using a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray reflectivity measurements at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the scientists discovered that, due to doping instabilities and/or charge transfer at the interface, an intermediate enriched Mn3+ layer of a few unit cells develops at the LSMO/STO interface. The presence of this intermediate layer may provide a mechanism for antiferromagnetic coupling across the interface — which, in turn, may lead to the reversed magnetic configuration observed in thicker LSMO films.

The findings demonstrate the rich variety of interfacial spin couplings that can occur in complex oxide thin films that may be utilized in engineering thin-film devices. This work was partially supported by the Semiconductor Research Corporation's NRI-WIN program.

####

About Brookhaven National Laboratory
One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, as well as in energy technologies and national security. Brookhaven Lab also builds and operates major scientific facilities available to university, industry and government researchers. Brookhaven is operated and managed for DOE’s Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates, a limited-liability company founded by Stony Brook University, the largest academic user of Laboratory facilities, and Battelle, a nonprofit, applied science and technology organization.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Karen McNulty Walsh
631.344.8350,

Copyright © Brookhaven National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Basque researchers turn light upside down February 23rd, 2018

Stiffness matters February 23rd, 2018

Imaging individual flexible DNA 'building blocks' in 3-D: Berkeley Lab researchers generate first images of 129 DNA structures February 22nd, 2018

'Memtransistor' brings world closer to brain-like computing: Combined memristor and transistor can process information and store memory with one device February 22nd, 2018

Thin films

A simple new approach to plastic solar cells: Osaka University researchers intelligently design new highly efficient organic solar cells based on amorphous electronic materials with potential for easy printing January 28th, 2018

Scientists reveal the fundamental limitation in the key material for solid-state lighting January 25th, 2018

Particle size matters for porous building blocks: Rice University scientists find porous nanoparticles get tougher under pressure, but not when assembled December 19th, 2017

MIPT scientists revisit optical constants of ultrathin gold films October 20th, 2017

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Imaging individual flexible DNA 'building blocks' in 3-D: Berkeley Lab researchers generate first images of 129 DNA structures February 22nd, 2018

'Memtransistor' brings world closer to brain-like computing: Combined memristor and transistor can process information and store memory with one device February 22nd, 2018

Arrowhead Receives Regulatory Clearance to Begin Phase 1 Study of ARO-AAT for Treatment of Alpha-1 Liver Disease February 22nd, 2018

Computers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with high color quality February 20th, 2018

Possible Futures

Basque researchers turn light upside down February 23rd, 2018

Stiffness matters February 23rd, 2018

Developing reliable quantum computers February 22nd, 2018

Imaging individual flexible DNA 'building blocks' in 3-D: Berkeley Lab researchers generate first images of 129 DNA structures February 22nd, 2018

Academic/Education

Luleĺ University of Technology is using the Deben CT5000TEC stage to perform x-ray microtomography experiments with the ZEISS Xradia 510 Versa to understand deformation and strain inside inhomogeneous materials November 7th, 2017

Park Systems Announces the Grand Opening of the Park NanoScience Center at SUNY Polytechnic Institute November 3rd, 2017

Two Scientists Receive Grants to Develop New Materials: Chad Mirkin and Monica Olvera de la Cruz recognized by Sherman Fairchild Foundation August 16th, 2017

Moving at the Speed of Light: University of Arizona selected for high-impact, industrial demonstration of new integrated photonic cryogenic datalink for focal plane arrays: Program is major milestone for AIM Photonics August 10th, 2017

Nanoelectronics

Basque researchers turn light upside down February 23rd, 2018

Graphene on toast, anyone? Rice University scientists create patterned graphene onto food, paper, cloth, cardboard February 13th, 2018

Vanadium dioxyde: A revolutionary material for tomorrow's electronics: Phase-chance switch can now be performed at higher temperatures February 5th, 2018

Measuring the temperature of two-dimensional materials at the atomic level February 3rd, 2018

Materials/Metamaterials

Basque researchers turn light upside down February 23rd, 2018

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected February 21st, 2018

Rutgers-Led Innovation Could Spur Faster, Cheaper, Nano-Based Manufacturing: Scalable and cost-effective manufacturing of thin film devices February 14th, 2018

Graphene on toast, anyone? Rice University scientists create patterned graphene onto food, paper, cloth, cardboard February 13th, 2018

Announcements

Basque researchers turn light upside down February 23rd, 2018

Stiffness matters February 23rd, 2018

Histology in 3-D: New staining method enables Nano-CT imaging of tissue samples February 22nd, 2018

Developing reliable quantum computers February 22nd, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project