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Home > Press > Purdue, IU Researchers Team For Startup

Abstract:
Nanotechnology devices are the focus of a new company created by two Purdue University professors and a physician scientist at the Indiana University School of Medicine. NanoSense Inc. will design devices for health care applications.

Purdue, IU Researchers Team For Startup

West Lafayette, IN | Posted on January 14th, 2011

Two Purdue University professors and a physician scientist at the Indiana University School of Medicine have created a company dedicated to developing nanotechnology devices for medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

Dr. Song-Chu "Arthur" Ko, Babak Ziaie and Teimour Maleki founded NanoSense Inc. in late 2010. Ko is an assistant professor of clinical radiation oncology at the IU School of Medicine, Ziaie is a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue, and Maleki is a research assistant professor at Purdue's Birck Nanotechnology Center. NanoSense is an affiliate of the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette.

NanoSense will design and produce micro/nano devices and commercialize them for health-care applications. Micro/nano devices are tiny chips that combine physical, chemical and optical sensing with control and motion to solid-state electronics.

Ko described some of the company's nanodevices being created to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy.

"We are developing miniaturized dosimeters for real-time dose monitoring, an implantable micro-oxygen generator to overcome hypoxia problems in radiation therapy or chemotherapy cancer treatment, and a wireless sensor for continuous tumor pressure monitoring to optimize the delivery time for chemotherapy drugs or radiation treatment," he said.

Maleki said one way patients benefit from nanotechnology devices is that they are much safer to use than conventional devices because of their smaller size.

"Essentially, all sensing and actuation in the macro-world can be miniaturized into a tiny capsule that can enter the micro-world and interact with life systems," he said. "Microdevices are much more sensitive and robust than their conventional counterparts and several sensing and actuation systems can be integrated into a single chip."

Ziaie and his colleagues affiliated NanoSense with the Purdue Research Park for several reasons.

"First, the park is physically close to Purdue University. Second, there are many unique amenities offered, including business development counseling," he said. "Finally, basing NanoSense here fosters successful interaction with Purdue and IU faculty in terms of taking concepts and intellectual property to market."

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About Purdue Research Park
The Purdue Research Park, with four locations across Indiana, has the largest university-affiliated business incubation complex in the country. The parks are home to about 200 companies that employ 4,000 people and are located in West Lafayette, Indianapolis, Merrillville and New Albany.

About NanoSense Inc.
NanoSense Inc. is an innovative biotechnology company established from a collaboration between Purdue University Birck Nanotechnology Center engineering professors and Indiana University Simon Cancer Center and Medical School biomedical researchers.

Copyright © Purdue Research Park

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