Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > WSU professor studies new metal

Single-layer graphene (0.34 nm thick); 1 nm = 1,000,000,000th of 1 meter. Credit: Professor Bor Z. Jang
Single-layer graphene (0.34 nm thick); 1 nm = 1,000,000,000th of 1 meter. Credit: Professor Bor Z. Jang

Abstract:
Not many materials are stronger than steel and can be stretched to cover a football stadium, however, graphene can be described in this way.

Bor Z. Jang, a professor of mechanical and materials engineering has been working with and researching this metal.

WSU professor studies new metal

Dayton, OH | Posted on November 29th, 2010

"Graphene is a new class of carbon nano material, which is now widely known due to the 2010 Noble Prize in Physics being recently awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their contributions to graphene physics," said Jang. "Graphene is an atomic layer of honeycomb or hexagon structure of carbon atoms, 0.34 millimeters thick."

Jang has been working with this material since 2000. He began working with this material when he realized that carbon nano-tubes, carbon nano-fibers, graphite and other carbon materials were all made with graphene. Before he started working on graphene he was working on carbon nano-tubes and carbon nano-fibers. Even though those materials are useful, he found graphene was cheaper.

"Since graphite is a naturally occurring substance, it should be very inexpensive if one can peel off graphene planes from existing graphite materials," said Jang. "During the 2000-2004 timeframe, my research team found several ways of effectively producing graphene."

According to Jang, graphene can be used for heat dissipation, batteries, fuel systems, car parts, plane lightning strike protection, water and chemical waste filtration and purification, cell phones, computers and many other important items that protect people or make day to day life easier.

Jang, who has around 160 patents, was inspired to be a scientist because of the U.S. space program of the 1960's, which includes the moon landing.

"There are quite a number of outstanding faculty members at Wright State who are active researchers in the field of grapheme," said Jang. "We make a great team. It is our hope to establish a research center for graphene materials and devices, perhaps under the sponsorship of the Ohio Third Frontier Program."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Stephanie Gottschlich
937-775-3251

Copyright © Wright State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Dartmouth team creates new method to control quantum systems May 24th, 2016

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Chemistry

Syracuse University chemists add color to chemical reactions: Chemists in the College of Arts and Sciences have come up with an innovative new way to visualize and monitor chemical reactions in real time May 19th, 2016

Technique improves the efficacy of fuel cells: Research demonstrates a new phase transition from metal to ionic conductor May 18th, 2016

Physicists measure van der Waals forces of individual atoms for the first time May 14th, 2016

Atomic force microscope reveals molecular ghosts: Mapping molecules with atomic precision expands toolbox for designing new catalytic reactions May 11th, 2016

Possible Futures

Dartmouth team creates new method to control quantum systems May 24th, 2016

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Academic/Education

Graphene: Progress, not quantum leaps May 23rd, 2016

Smithsonian Science Education Center and National Space Society Team Up for Next-Generation Space Education Program "Enterprise In Space" May 11th, 2016

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation May 9th, 2016

Albertan Science Lab Opens in India May 7th, 2016

Announcements

Dartmouth team creates new method to control quantum systems May 24th, 2016

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Energy

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Technique improves the efficacy of fuel cells: Research demonstrates a new phase transition from metal to ionic conductor May 18th, 2016

This 'nanocavity' may improve ultrathin solar panels, video cameras and more May 16th, 2016

New research shows how silver could be the key to gold-standard flexible gadgets: Silver nanowires are an ideal material for current and future flexible touch-screen technologies May 13th, 2016

Water

Mille-feuille-filter removes viruses from water May 19th, 2016

First single-enzyme method to produce quantum dots revealed: Biological manufacturing process, pioneered by three Lehigh University engineers, produces equivalent quantum dots to those made chemically--but in a much greener, cheaper way May 9th, 2016

Understanding tiny droplets can make for better weather forecasts: Climate change models also benefit from understanding fundamental thermodynamics of water droplets May 6th, 2016

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Automotive/Transportation

Technique improves the efficacy of fuel cells: Research demonstrates a new phase transition from metal to ionic conductor May 18th, 2016

A View Through Wood Shows Futuristic Applications: Transparent wood made at UMD could create new windows, cars and solar panels May 5th, 2016

Speedy ion conduction in solid electrolytes clears road for advanced energy devices May 5th, 2016

New spin Seebeck thermoelectric device with higher conversion efficiency created April 26th, 2016

Aerospace/Space

Rice de-icer gains anti-icing properties: Dual-function, graphene-based material good for aircraft, extreme environments May 23rd, 2016

We’ll Leave the Lights On For You: Photonics advances allow us to be seen across the universe, with major implications for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, says UC Santa Barbara physicist Philip Lubin - See more at: http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2016/016805/we-ll-leave-li May 17th, 2016

Smithsonian Science Education Center and National Space Society Team Up for Next-Generation Space Education Program "Enterprise In Space" May 11th, 2016

Physicists detect the enigmatic spin momentum of light April 26th, 2016

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

Distance wireless charging enhanced by magnetic metamaterials: A metamaterial shell is capable of multiplying transmission efficiency several times over May 13th, 2016

Abalonyx launches Reduced Graphene Oxide Product: Abalonyx has successfully scaled up production of thermally reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in its Tofte, Norway, production facility. This product is now offered to customers in Kg-quantities May 10th, 2016

Visualizing the Lithiation of a Nanosized Iron-Oxide Material in Real Time: Electron microscopy technique reveals the reaction pathways that emerge as lithium ions are added to magnetite nanoparticles May 9th, 2016

Speedy ion conduction in solid electrolytes clears road for advanced energy devices May 5th, 2016

Fuel Cells

Technique improves the efficacy of fuel cells: Research demonstrates a new phase transition from metal to ionic conductor May 18th, 2016

Ruthenium nanoframes open the doors to better catalysts April 4th, 2016

Saving sunshine for a rainy day: New catalyst offers efficient storage of green energy: Team led by U of T Engineering designs world's most efficient catalyst for storing energy as hydrogen by splitting water molecules March 28th, 2016

Carbon leads the way in clean energy: Groundbreaking research at Griffith University is leading the way in clean energy, with the use of carbon as a way to deliver energy using hydrogen March 23rd, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic