Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Computer chip technology advancing

Paul Swanson
Paul Swanson

Abstract:
The next generation of computer chips might be created in something not much more complex than a microwave oven and the technology is being developed right here at the U of A.

By Jon Grier, News Writer

Computer chip technology advancing

Alberta | Posted on November 18th, 2010

Jillian Buriak is a senior researcher at the National Institute for Nanotechnology. One of her group's projects could further revolutionize the production of computer chips.

After a short stint in the microwave, a silicon chip prepared using plastic polymers forms a pattern of lines or rings that is far more complex than what a conventional computer chip has. The lines formed from this reaction, only tens of nanometers apart from each other, act as a template for conductive material to be applied on.

"The polymer can be induced with a little bit of outside intervention. [Polymers] can say, 'Hey, I'm going to form these rings.' They can do it perfectly," Buriak said.

The outside intervention, a simple microwave oven, was the U of A group's big innovation. To make a computer chip template that complex, it can take up to three days by normal industry methods. The industry set a goal of cutting this down to four minutes; the group found that a microwave could do it in 20 seconds.

Ken Harris, a researcher working under Buriak, came up with the original idea for this inexpensive and unconventional method, along with other members of the team.

"The fact that [the rings] assemble — people have known that for quite a while now […] That, we didn't invent. But the technique for making that happen quickly is brand new."

Harris said the fact that there are even more lines than a conventional computer chips could have implications for electronics.

"The more devices you can pack onto a chip, the faster and more powerful that computer is. So a lot of that depends on how far [the lines] are separated."

The computer chip industry wants to find a way to produce chips with a high level of density as efficiently as possible. Since the scale is so small, the alignment of the pattern has to be perfect or else the chip becomes worthless. If it is possible to produce properly aligned chips with equipment as inexpensive as a household microwave, Buriak explained that it could have serious implications for the industry.

There are more applications for the process than mass-producing faster chips, according to Buriak. The relationship between the polymers that create the chip template is similar to how living cells recognize one another and form a larger entity. By treating these cells the same way, it may be possible to interface living cells with silicon the same way the plastic polymers work.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University of Alberta

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

UT Arlington researchers develop transparent nanoscintillators for radiation detection for medical safety and homeland security September 29th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Determine Grain Size, Minimize Time of Nanocomposite Synthesis September 29th, 2014

Nanoparticles Used to Improve Quality of Bone Cement September 29th, 2014

'Pixel' engineered electronics have growth potential: Rice, Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt, Penn scientists lead creation of atom-scale semiconducting composites September 29th, 2014

Possible Futures

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

IBM Announces $3 Billion Research Initiative to Tackle Chip Grand Challenges for Cloud and Big Data Systems: Scientists and engineers to push limits of silicon technology to 7 nanometers and below and create post-silicon future July 10th, 2014

Virus structure inspires novel understanding of onion-like carbon nanoparticles April 10th, 2014

Local girl does good March 22nd, 2014

Academic/Education

Biosensors Get a Boost from Graphene Partnership: $5 Million Investment Supports Dozens of Jobs and Development of 300mm Fabrication Process and Wafer Transfer Facility September 18th, 2014

Malvern technology delivers Malvern reliability in multi-disciplinary lab at Queen Mary University London September 9th, 2014

State University of New York Trustees Unanimously Approve SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) as New Name for Merged SUNY CNSE / SUNYIT September 9th, 2014

New Vice President Takes Helm at CNSE CMOST: Catherine Gilbert To Lead CNSE Children’s Museum of Science and Technology Through Expansion And Relocation August 29th, 2014

Chip Technology

'Pixel' engineered electronics have growth potential: Rice, Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt, Penn scientists lead creation of atom-scale semiconducting composites September 29th, 2014

Future flexible electronics based on carbon nanotubes: Study in Applied Physics Letters show how to improve nanotube transistor and circuit performance with fluoropolymers September 23rd, 2014

Twisted graphene chills out: When two sheets of graphene are stacked in a special way, it is possible to cool down the graphene with a laser instead of heating it up, University of Manchester researchers have shown September 22nd, 2014

SouthWest NanoTechnologies (SWeNT) Receives NIST Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 Award to Produce Greater than 99% Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes September 19th, 2014

Nanoelectronics

Grenoble Hosting SEMICON Europa Oct. 7-9, First Time Event Held in France: Leti’s 90-square-meter Booth Will Feature Portable Showroom To Demonstrate New Technology Innovations September 24th, 2014

SouthWest NanoTechnologies (SWeNT) Receives NIST Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 Award to Produce Greater than 99% Semiconducting Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes September 19th, 2014

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Excitonic Dark States Shed Light on TMDC Atomic Layers: Berkeley Lab Discovery Holds Promise for Nanoelectronic and Photonic Applications September 11th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE