Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Computer chip technology advancing

Paul Swanson
Paul Swanson

Abstract:
The next generation of computer chips might be created in something not much more complex than a microwave oven and the technology is being developed right here at the U of A.

By Jon Grier, News Writer

Computer chip technology advancing

Alberta | Posted on November 18th, 2010

Jillian Buriak is a senior researcher at the National Institute for Nanotechnology. One of her group's projects could further revolutionize the production of computer chips.

After a short stint in the microwave, a silicon chip prepared using plastic polymers forms a pattern of lines or rings that is far more complex than what a conventional computer chip has. The lines formed from this reaction, only tens of nanometers apart from each other, act as a template for conductive material to be applied on.

"The polymer can be induced with a little bit of outside intervention. [Polymers] can say, 'Hey, I'm going to form these rings.' They can do it perfectly," Buriak said.

The outside intervention, a simple microwave oven, was the U of A group's big innovation. To make a computer chip template that complex, it can take up to three days by normal industry methods. The industry set a goal of cutting this down to four minutes; the group found that a microwave could do it in 20 seconds.

Ken Harris, a researcher working under Buriak, came up with the original idea for this inexpensive and unconventional method, along with other members of the team.

"The fact that [the rings] assemble — people have known that for quite a while now […] That, we didn't invent. But the technique for making that happen quickly is brand new."

Harris said the fact that there are even more lines than a conventional computer chips could have implications for electronics.

"The more devices you can pack onto a chip, the faster and more powerful that computer is. So a lot of that depends on how far [the lines] are separated."

The computer chip industry wants to find a way to produce chips with a high level of density as efficiently as possible. Since the scale is so small, the alignment of the pattern has to be perfect or else the chip becomes worthless. If it is possible to produce properly aligned chips with equipment as inexpensive as a household microwave, Buriak explained that it could have serious implications for the industry.

There are more applications for the process than mass-producing faster chips, according to Buriak. The relationship between the polymers that create the chip template is similar to how living cells recognize one another and form a larger entity. By treating these cells the same way, it may be possible to interface living cells with silicon the same way the plastic polymers work.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University of Alberta

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Meet the high-performance single-molecule diode: Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Berkeley Lab and Columbia University team July 29th, 2015

Detecting small metallic contaminants in food via magnetization: A practical metallic-contaminant detecting system using three high-Tc RF superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) July 29th, 2015

Controlling phase changes in solids: Controlling phase changes in solids July 29th, 2015

New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life: Two Brookhaven researchers developed theoretical model to explain the origins of self-replicating molecules July 28th, 2015

Possible Futures

Smaller, faster, cheaper: A new type of modulator for the future of data transmission July 27th, 2015

Researchers predict material with record-setting melting point July 27th, 2015

Global Corrosion Resistant Nano Coatings Market To 2015: Acute Market Reports July 27th, 2015

Global Zinc oxide nanopowders Industry 2015: Acute Market Reports July 25th, 2015

Academic/Education

Deben reports on the use of their CT500 in the X-ray microtomography laboratory at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia July 22nd, 2015

JPK reports on the use of SPM in the Messersmith Group at UC Berkeley looking at biologically inspired polymer adhesives. July 21st, 2015

Renishaw adds Raman analysis to Scanning Electron Microscopy at the University of Sydney, Australia July 9th, 2015

Oxford Instruments’ TritonXL Cryofree dilution refrigerator selected for the Oxford NQIT Quantum Technology Hub project June 30th, 2015

Chip Technology

Meet the high-performance single-molecule diode: Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Berkeley Lab and Columbia University team July 29th, 2015

Nanometrics Announces Upcoming Investor Events July 28th, 2015

Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes: Berkeley Lab researchers create Ludinger liquid plasmons in metallic SWNTs July 28th, 2015

Quantum networks: Back and forth are not equal distances! July 28th, 2015

Nanoelectronics

Superfast fluorescence sets new speed record: Plasmonic device has speed and efficiency to serve optical computers July 27th, 2015

Spintronics: Molecules stabilizing magnetism: Organic molecules fixing the magnetic orientation of a cobalt surface/ building block for a compact and low-cost storage technology/ publication in Nature Materials July 25th, 2015

ORNL researchers make scalable arrays of 'building blocks' for ultrathin electronics July 22nd, 2015

An easy, scalable and direct method for synthesizing graphene in silicon microelectronics: Korean researchers grow 4-inch diameter, high-quality, multi-layer graphene on desired silicon substrates, an important step for harnessing graphene in commercial silicon microelectronics July 21st, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project