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Home > News > Nokia Morph could change the future of mobile technology

February 23rd, 2010

Nokia Morph could change the future of mobile technology

Abstract:
Gadget and mobile phone lovers alike will really like this - a promotional viral video that could show the future of mobile technology, or should I say… nanotechnology.

Morph is more of a concept that demonstrates many of the future possiblities of nanotechnology that could be enabled in the world of telecommunication.

Source:
simbasics.co.uk

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