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Home > News > Using CNTs as infrared sensors

January 6th, 2010

Using CNTs as infrared sensors

Abstract:
Semiconductors provide the bases for many different avenues of device research. Indeed, many of the technological devices that are commonplace in our society are reliant on semiconductors. However, as we increasingly explore the opportunities afforded on the nanoscale, new semiconductor materials are needed. One of the more promising semiconducting materials at this level is the carbon nanotube (CNT).

"There is great promise in using a carbon nanotubes for sensors." Ning Xi tells PhysOrg.com. Xi is John D. Ryder Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Michigan State University, and leads a group that is working on engineering CNT band gaps for use as infrared sensors. Xi worked with Kin Wai Chiu Lai, Carmen Kar Man Fung and Hongzhi Chen at Michigan State, and Tzyh-Jong Tarn at Wasington University in St. Louis to develop a process that is described in Applied Physics Letters: "Engineering the band gap of carbon nanotube for infrared sensors." This project is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

Source:
physorg.com

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