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Home > News > Nanotube research has a surprise ally: DNA

July 23rd, 2009

Nanotube research has a surprise ally: DNA

Abstract:
Carbon nanotubes hold the promise of flexible electronics, smart sensors and unique medical devices.

But before they can be put to wide commercial use, scientists have to figure out a way to sort through the tangle of different types of nanotubes that results when the tiny structures are made.

A team of DuPont Co. and Lehigh University researchers has taken a big step forward by refining a process to sort nanotubes using a surprising material: DNA.

The research, led by DuPont research associate Ming Zheng, built on a 2003 project that first showed that nanotubes could be sorted using a sequence of DNA, the substance that carries genetic instructions for living organisms.

Source:
delawareonline.com

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