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Home > Press > Breakthrough in Artificial Muscles to be Featured on ScienceNews Radio Network, also First On-Site Report From Houston on TechConnect NSTI Conference

Abstract:
New robotic muscles can withstand temperatures extremes from near absolute zero to those that melt steel, also despite Swine Flu scare NSTI's TechConnect in Houston a great success

Breakthrough in Artificial Muscles to be Featured on ScienceNews Radio Network, also First On-Site Report From Houston on TechConnect NSTI Conference

Dallas, TX | Posted on May 7th, 2009

Scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas have revealed dramatic advances in artificial muscles that are very fast, highly flexible, incredibly strong, and can withstand temperatures that would melt steel or freeze other machinery in its tracks. "These muscles can be vital in robots operating in hostile environments such as space exploration," says Dr. Ray Baughman, Director of the Nanotech Institute there. Unlike previous muscles these are powered by electricity rather than fuels and have a wide range of expansion.



Dr. Baughman revealed these advances to Colonel Mason on the ScienceNews Network radio program, host of The Promise of Tomorrow, to be aired in Dallas/Fort Worth Sunday, 7-8pm on KMNY 1360 AM. Also Mason will report on his first-hand impressions of the TechConnect conference produced by NSTI that is just finishing up in Houston today. "The swine flu scare made no difference this year," says Mason, "NSTI continues to develop into a first rate conference/expo on emerging science and nanotechnology. Those who stayed away missed a great show, and they are doing the post mortem now so we'll be able to reveal all the demographics on a later program. Also, we got a very revealing interview with the Russians we'll be airing soon too."

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About The Promise of Tomorrow radio program
The radio program, The Promise of Tomorrow with Colonel Mason, studies the commercial business of emerging science and nanotechnology, and has a history of keeping abreast of breaking commercial advances. It is aired in Dallas and Fort Worth with a possible audience of over two million, then archived on the Web to an audience that is world-wide, www.PromiseOfTomorrow.biz and receives about 10,000 hits per day.



About The Promise of Tomorrow radio program:
The award-winning creator and host of the program is veteran news reporter, Colonel Mason. Past programs featured reports on how nanotechnology has led to human gum regeneration; nanotechnology in Iran, Singapore, China, Israel, and around the world; how nanotech coatings bring protection from graffiti; how Texas is funding new firms in emerging technologies.

Other important topics covered include biodegradable plastics; atomic manipulation and building things with atomic precision for practical uses; medicine; nerve regeneration, human tissue interfacing with bionics; artificial muscles; the fallacy of BioFuels; targeting cancer tumors with nanotechnology and colloidal gold based compounds administered directly at the site of the disease while not affecting other organs; water purification using nanotechnology; how hydrogen is abundant and easy to collect, and (in solid form) the next fuel needed to replace gasoline, jet fuel, and generate electricity; plus views from scientific living legends and Nobel Laureates.

The hour long program is a wealth of information each week, also featuring headline news in emerging science, the latest tiny tech jobs, wise advice from the Den of Strangers, and what has become the very popular Voice of Reason. It is aired each Sunday from 7 to 8 pm on KMNY 1360AM radio www.RationalRadio.org, then promptly archived on the Web. Colonel Mason welcomes suggestions on topics and/or guests. Email to or contact directly by phone at 214.329.4949

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Colonel Mason
214-329-4949

Copyright © The Promise of Tomorrow radio program

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