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Home > News > Hamsters Get Nanotechnology Now But We Could Be Waiting for Ten Years

March 27th, 2009

Hamsters Get Nanotechnology Now But We Could Be Waiting for Ten Years

Abstract:
Bend, stretch, or shake a zinc oxide nanowire and it will generate a tiny electrical pulse. Link several of them together, and they could crank out enough juice to power microscopic gadgets.

As machines get smaller, their demand for power decreases drastically, says Zhong Lin Wang, a nanotechnology expert from Georgia Tech. Nano-devices would require so little energy that they could be powered by sound waves and muscle twitches.

To prove his point, Wang attached a single nanowire to the back of a hamster and then hooked it up to an oscilloscope. As the rodent it scurried around, it generated 70 millivolts. When the critter stopped to lick itself, the power levels decreased.

Source:
Wired

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