Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Intel Science Talent Search 2009 Winners Announced

Eric Larson (right), 17, of Eugene, Ore., wins top honors at the 2009 Intel Science Talent Search and a $100,000 scholarship from the Intel Foundation. Larson congratulates second and third place winners William Sun (middle), 17, of Chesterfield, Mo., who received a $75,000 scholarship, and Philip Streich (left), 18, of Platteville, Wis., who received a $50,000 scholarship in America's oldest and most prestigious science competition. (Photo: Business Wire)
Eric Larson (right), 17, of Eugene, Ore., wins top honors at the 2009 Intel Science Talent Search and a $100,000 scholarship from the Intel Foundation. Larson congratulates second and third place winners William Sun (middle), 17, of Chesterfield, Mo., who received a $75,000 scholarship, and Philip Streich (left), 18, of Platteville, Wis., who received a $50,000 scholarship in America's oldest and most prestigious science competition. (Photo: Business Wire)

Abstract:
Honoring the next generation of American innovators, Intel Corporation today announced the winners of America's oldest and most prestigious pre-college science competition, the Intel Science Talent Search, a program of Society for Science & the Public. Eric Larson, 17, of Eugene, Ore., won the top award, a $100,000 scholarship from the Intel Foundation, for his research project classifying mathematical objects called fusion categories. Eric's work describes these in certain dimensions for the first time.

Intel Science Talent Search 2009 Winners Announced

Washington, DC | Posted on March 14th, 2009

Also achieving top honors in the competition:

Second Place: William Sun, 17, of Chesterfield, Mo., received a $75,000 scholarship for his biochemistry project that studied the effects of a recently discovered molecule that could potentially help efforts to treat bacterial infections or prevent neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

Third Place: Philip Streich, 18, of Platteville, Wis., received a $50,000 scholarship for his chemistry project on carbon nanotubes that may lead to the development of ultra-strong materials and ultra-fast nano-electronics. Philip's work has resulted in five provisional patent filings.

Fourth Place: Narendra Tallapragada, 17, of Burke, Va., received a $25,000 scholarship for his project to find ways to simplify complex models of atomic and molecular interactions. His goal is to one day create "mini-computers" that can be used, for instance, to create automatic insulin pumps inside diabetic patients or intelligent clothing that responds to temperature.

Fifth Place: Chelsea Jurman, 17, of Roslyn, N.Y., received a $25,000 scholarship for studying underage drinking behavior and how it is tied to teen perceptions of parental drinking and parenting behaviors.

Sixth Place: Noah Arbesfeld, 17, of Lexington, Mass., received a $25,000 scholarship for his work seeking to understand a fundamental structure underlying all of algebra, with potential impact for string theory.

Seventh Place: Alexander Kim, 17, of Fairfax, Va., received a $20,000 scholarship for researching the variation and diversification in populations of the Giant American River Prawn, the largest freshwater invertebrate in North America. His research furthers understanding of how species evolve and has implications for the future of ecosystems.

Eighth Place: Preya Shah, 17, of Setauket, N.Y., received a $20,000 scholarship for designing and synthesizing a tumor-targeting drug for cancer treatment that represents a new approach to delivery of chemotherapy agents and possibly treatment of multi-drug resistant cancer without causing significant side effects.

Ninth Place: Nilesh Tripuraneni, 18, of Fresno, Calif., received a $20,000 scholarship for formulating a set of hydrodynamic equations that may provide a potential method to better understand the first movements of the universe and could aid in the development of a quantum theory of gravity.

Tenth Place: Gabriela Farfan, 18, of Madison, Wis., received a $20,000 scholarship for her project investigating Oregon Sunstones, which contain one of the most common rock forming minerals in the world. She determined that these sunstones have unique micro-inclusions that allow them to look one color from one angle and another from a different angle.

The remaining 30 finalists received $5,000 scholarships and a new laptop powered by an Intel® Core™2 Duo processor.

This year's Intel Science Talent Search finalists come from 17 states and represent 35 schools. Of the more than 1,600 high school seniors who entered the Intel Science Talent Search 2009, 300 were announced as semifinalists in January. Of those, 40 were chosen as finalists and invited to Washington, D.C., to compete for the top 10 awards.

"At a time when our country requires innovation to spur economic growth, it is inspiring to see such talented young people using critical thinking skills to find solutions to scientific challenges," said Intel Chairman Craig Barrett. "These 40 scientists not only represent hope for America to remain competitive in the global economy, but also verify the power of investing in math and science."

The Intel Science Talent Search encourages students to tackle challenging scientific questions and develop the skills necessary to solve the problems of tomorrow. Over the past 67 years, Science Talent Search finalists have gone on to win seven Nobel Prizes, a Fields Medal, the National Medal of Science and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Society for Science & the Public, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the public engagement in scientific research and education, has owned and administered the Science Talent Search since its inception in 1942.

Elizabeth Marincola, president of Society for Science & the Public said, "The road to mitigating the most challenging problems we face, not just as a country but as a world, is paved with science. Society for Science & the Public is proud to join with Intel in congratulating Eric and all of the Intel Science Talent Search 2009 finalists whose dedication to science and research will lead us down this road."

Intel believes that students everywhere deserve to have the skills necessary to become the next generation of innovators. Intel's commitment to education extends far beyond the Intel Science Talent Search. Over the past decade alone, the company has invested more than $1 billion, and its employees have donated more than 2.5 million hours toward improving education in 50 countries. The Intel Science Talent Search is jointly funded by Intel Corporation and Intel Foundation.

To view an online press kit, visit www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/events/sts2009/index.htm, to join Intel's community of people inspired by education, visit www.inspiredbyeducation.com, or visit www.intel.com/education. To learn more about Society for Science & the Public, visit www.societyforscience.org.

Satellite feed information: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 at 3:00 - 3:15 a.m. EDT and 10:00 - 10:15 a.m. EDT. Galaxy 19; Transponder 15; C-Band; Downlink Frequency: 4,000 Vertical.

####

About Intel Corporation
Intel (NASDAQ:INTC), the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com/.

Intel, the Intel logo, and Intel Education Initiative are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Intel Corporation
Gail Dundas
503-816-2382

or
For Intel Corporation
Kara Gaffney
646-204-6343

or
Society for Science & the Public
Rick Bates
202-669-4288

Copyright © Business Wire 2009

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Research Study: MetaSOLTM Shatters Solar Panel Efficiency Forecasts with Innovative New Coating: Coating Provides 1.2 Percent Absolute Enhancement to Triple Junction Solar Cells December 2nd, 2016

Deep insights from surface reactions: Researchers use Stampede supercomputer to study new chemical sensing methods, desalination and bacterial energy production December 2nd, 2016

Quantum obstacle course changes material from superconductor to insulator December 1st, 2016

Throwing new light on printed organic solar cells December 1st, 2016

Academic/Education

Oxford Nanoimaging report on how the Nanoimager, a desktop microscope delivering single molecule, super-resolution performance, is being applied at the MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology & Infection November 22nd, 2016

The University of Applied Sciences in Upper Austria uses Deben tensile stages as an integral part of their computed tomography research and testing facility October 18th, 2016

Enterprise In Space Partners with Sketchfab and 3D Hubs for NewSpace Education October 13th, 2016

New Agricultural Research Center Debuts at UCF October 12th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Supersonic spray yields new nanomaterial for bendable, wearable electronics: Film of self-fused nanowires clear as glass, conducts like metal November 23rd, 2016

What a twist: Silicon nanoantennas turn light around: The theoretical results will allow scientists to design nanodevices with extraordinary features for use in optoelectronics November 21st, 2016

2-D material a brittle surprise: Rice University researchers finds molybdenum diselenide not as strong as they thought November 14th, 2016

UCR researchers discover new method to dissipate heat in electronic devices: By modulating the flow of phonons through semiconductor nanowires, engineers can create smaller and faster devices November 13th, 2016

Materials/Metamaterials

Inside tiny tubes, water turns solid when it should be boiling: MIT researchers discover astonishing behavior of water confined in carbon nanotubes November 30th, 2016

From champagne bubbles, dance parties and disease to new nanomaterials: Understanding nucleation of protein filaments might help with Alzheimer's Disease and type 2 Diabetes November 24th, 2016

Uncovering the secrets of friction on graphene: Sliding on flexible graphene surfaces has been uncharted territory until now November 23rd, 2016

2-D material a brittle surprise: Rice University researchers finds molybdenum diselenide not as strong as they thought November 14th, 2016

Announcements

Research Study: MetaSOLTM Shatters Solar Panel Efficiency Forecasts with Innovative New Coating: Coating Provides 1.2 Percent Absolute Enhancement to Triple Junction Solar Cells December 2nd, 2016

Deep insights from surface reactions: Researchers use Stampede supercomputer to study new chemical sensing methods, desalination and bacterial energy production December 2nd, 2016

Quantum obstacle course changes material from superconductor to insulator December 1st, 2016

Throwing new light on printed organic solar cells December 1st, 2016

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Keystone Nano Announces The US FDA Has Awarded Orphan Drug Designation For Ceramides For The Treatment Of Liver Cancer November 8th, 2016

Leti to Tackle Tomorrow's Research Strategies with Stanford University’s SystemX Alliance: French R&D Center Is the First Research Institute to Join the Collaboration and Provides Bridges Between Academia and Industry, Leveraging Alliance’s Potential October 4th, 2016

Picosun patents ALD nanolaminate to prevent electronics from overheating September 28th, 2016

NIST Patents Single-Photon Detector for Potential Encryption and Sensing Apps September 16th, 2016

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Quantum obstacle course changes material from superconductor to insulator December 1st, 2016

'Back to the Future' inspires solar nanotech-powered clothing November 15th, 2016

2-D material a brittle surprise: Rice University researchers finds molybdenum diselenide not as strong as they thought November 14th, 2016

New Book by Nobel Laureate Tells Story of Chemistry’s New Field: Fraser Stoddart explains the mechanical bond and where it is taking scientists November 11th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project