Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > News > Nanotubes suppress immune response of human lung cells.

March 6th, 2009

Nanotubes suppress immune response of human lung cells.

Abstract:
Extremely small carbon nanotubes can move through lung fluid and suppress normal immune responses in human lung cells, finds this laboratory study.

A nanomaterial prized for its potential use in electronics moved through human lung fluid and altered the way lung cells reacted to infections, possibly reducing their ability to signal immune defenders and fight off the invaders.

The results add more concern about the safety of the very tiny particles called single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Workers who make the materials -- and consumers who use them -- may be at risk if the nanomaterials are inhaled.

If breathed in, the materials may make the immune system less responsive to infections, suggest the authors. This could lead to more and longer respiratory diseases in those exposed to the fibrous particles.

SWCNT and other nanomaterials are very small particles, in the neighborhood of one billionth of a meter. Their small size gives them properties not found in their larger counterparts. SWCNTs are being investigated for use in electronics, transparent conducting films and building materials such as ultra-tough fibers.

While the new materials are expected to provide many benefits, the full impact on society should take into consideration negative consequences of material production and release into the environment. Slight modifications of the surface chemistry are known to alter the properties of the materials and may offer a way to modify their toxic interactions with living systems.

Source:
environmentalhealthnews.org

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Clues on the path to a new lithium battery technology: Charging produces highly reactive singlet oxygen in lithium air batteries May 5th, 2016

Unique nano-capsules promise the targeted drug delivery: Russian scientists created unique nano-capsules for the targeted drug delivery May 5th, 2016

Molybdenum disulfide holds promise for light absorption: Rice researchers probe light-capturing properties of atomically thin MoS2 May 5th, 2016

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

NREL finds nanotube semiconductors well-suited for PV systems April 27th, 2016

Researchers create artificial protein to control assembly of buckyballs April 27th, 2016

Discoveries

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Unique nano-capsules promise the targeted drug delivery: Russian scientists created unique nano-capsules for the targeted drug delivery May 5th, 2016

Molybdenum disulfide holds promise for light absorption: Rice researchers probe light-capturing properties of atomically thin MoS2 May 5th, 2016

The intermediates in a chemical reaction photographed 'red-handed' Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have for the first time succeeded in imaging all the steps in a complex organic reaction and have resolved the mechanisms that explain it May 4th, 2016

Announcements

Engineers create a better way to boil water -- with industrial, electronics applications May 5th, 2016

Clues on the path to a new lithium battery technology: Charging produces highly reactive singlet oxygen in lithium air batteries May 5th, 2016

Unique nano-capsules promise the targeted drug delivery: Russian scientists created unique nano-capsules for the targeted drug delivery May 5th, 2016

Molybdenum disulfide holds promise for light absorption: Rice researchers probe light-capturing properties of atomically thin MoS2 May 5th, 2016

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

Scientists propose non-animal tools for assessing the toxicity of nanomaterials: Particle and Fibre Toxicology publishes recommendations from expert group meeting April 26th, 2016

The impact of anti-odor clothing on the environment March 31st, 2016

SUNY Poly, in Collaboration with the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Stony Brook University, Demonstrates Pioneering Method to Visualize and Identify Engineered Nanoparticles in Tissue March 25th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic