Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > News > Nanotubes That See Everything: Carbon nanotubes that respond to visible light might mean better solar cells and artificial retinas.

March 5th, 2009

Nanotubes That See Everything: Carbon nanotubes that respond to visible light might mean better solar cells and artificial retinas.

Abstract:
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, in Livermore, CA, have created the first carbon-nanotube devices that can detect the entire visible spectrum of light. Their work might one day find a range of applications, including in solar cells that absorb more light, tiny cameras that work in very low light, and better artificial retinas.

Other researchers have demonstrated nanotubes that can detect light of specific wavelengths, including ultraviolet light, but never the entire visible spectrum of light. "This is a significant milestone," says George Grüner, a professor of physics and head of the Nano-Biophysics Group at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved in the Sandia work.

The light sensor inside a digital camera--known as a charge-coupled device--converts light into an electrical signal because as photons bombard silicon, they create electron holes in the material. In contrast, carbon-nanotube light sensors work in a similar way to biological eyes. The nanotubes are decorated with three kinds of chromophores--molecules that change shape in response to a particular wavelength of light. This change in shape results in a change in the chromophores' orientations with respect to the nanotube that, in turn, changes the electrical conductivity of the nanotube in a way that can be measured to deduce the color and intensity of the light. The Sandia researchers used three different types of chromophores, which respond to either red, green, or blue bands of the visible-light spectrum.

Source:
technologyreview.com

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Pioneering Southampton scientist awarded prestigious physics medal July 3rd, 2015

Groundbreaking research to help control liquids at micro and nano scales July 3rd, 2015

New technology using silver may hold key to electronics advances July 2nd, 2015

Discovery of nanotubes offers new clues about cell-to-cell communication July 2nd, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Discovery of nanotubes offers new clues about cell-to-cell communication July 2nd, 2015

NIST Group Maps Distribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials July 2nd, 2015

NIST ‘How-To’ Website Documents Procedures for Nano-EHS Research and Testing July 1st, 2015

Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3-D June 17th, 2015

Discoveries

Groundbreaking research to help control liquids at micro and nano scales July 3rd, 2015

The quantum middle man July 2nd, 2015

Producing spin-entangled electrons July 2nd, 2015

NIST Group Maps Distribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials July 2nd, 2015

Announcements

Pioneering Southampton scientist awarded prestigious physics medal July 3rd, 2015

Groundbreaking research to help control liquids at micro and nano scales July 3rd, 2015

Producing spin-entangled electrons July 2nd, 2015

NIST Group Maps Distribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Composite Materials July 2nd, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project