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Home > News > Graphene the future silicon

January 7th, 2008

Graphene the future silicon

Abstract:
Researchers at Manchester University have found that graphene could be the best possible material for electronic applications because of its semiconducting qualities.

The study also opens doors for new applications such as ultra-high frequency detectors for full-body security scanners, which could operate at terahertz frequencies.

‘Graphene is the only material where electrons at room temperature can move thousands of interatomic distances without scattering,' said Prof Andre Geim, director of Manchester University's Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology.

Source:
theengineer.co.uk

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