Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > News > Researcher uncovers electronic properties of carbon nanotubes

July 19th, 2007

Researcher uncovers electronic properties of carbon nanotubes

Abstract:
Air Force Office of Scientific Research-funded analysis is creating transistors based on carbon nanotubes, ultrathin tubes of carbon a few atoms in width.

In discussing his research, Stanford University, Calif., team leader Dr. David Goldhaber-Gordon says that "Specifically, we are creating devices in which several ultra-fine metal wires are placed on top of a carbon nanotube to locally deplete electrons and create barriers for electron flow. Measuring electron flow across these barriers then reveals important information about the nature of electronic transport in one dimension.

"Such an understanding will be essential in reaching the ultimate limits of device miniaturization," said Mr. Goldhaber-Gordon, considered to be one of the United States' leading scientists in the field of condensed matter physics. "In addition to allowing manufacturers to pack more and more switches onto a single chip, device miniaturization helps reduce power consumption and heat dissipation per device -- critical issues for many Air Force platforms, from manned fighter planes to autonomous drones."

Source:
afmc.af.mil

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

High-speed FM-AFM and simulation reveal atomistic dissolution processes of calcite in water July 28th, 2017

Atomic movies may help explain why perovskite solar cells are more efficient: SLAC's ultrafast 'electron camera' captures surprising atomic motions in these next-generation materials July 28th, 2017

Triple-layer catalyst does double duty: Rice, University of Houston produce robust catalyst to split water into hydrogen, oxygen July 28th, 2017

Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing: New approach yields long-lasting configurations that could provide long-sought “qubit” material July 27th, 2017

Chip Technology

Atomic discovery opens door to greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitry: Scientists find way to correct communication pathways in silicon chips, making them perfect July 27th, 2017

Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductors: Brookhaven Lab scientists discover spontaneous voltage perpendicular to applied current that may help unravel the mystery of high-temperature superconductors July 27th, 2017

First Capacitive Transducer with 13nm Gap July 27th, 2017

Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevices July 27th, 2017

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Regulation of two-dimensional nanomaterials: New driving force for lithium-ion batteries July 26th, 2017

Killing cancer in the heat of the moment: A new method efficiently transfers genes into cells, then activates them with light. This could lead to gene therapies for cancers July 9th, 2017

Tests show no nanotubes released during utilisation of nanoaugmented materials June 9th, 2017

Ag/ZnO-Nanorods Schottky diodes based UV-PDs are fabricated and tested May 26th, 2017

Discoveries

High-speed FM-AFM and simulation reveal atomistic dissolution processes of calcite in water July 28th, 2017

Atomic movies may help explain why perovskite solar cells are more efficient: SLAC's ultrafast 'electron camera' captures surprising atomic motions in these next-generation materials July 28th, 2017

Triple-layer catalyst does double duty: Rice, University of Houston produce robust catalyst to split water into hydrogen, oxygen July 28th, 2017

First Capacitive Transducer with 13nm Gap July 27th, 2017

Military

Ultracold molecules hold promise for quantum computing: New approach yields long-lasting configurations that could provide long-sought “qubit” material July 27th, 2017

Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks July 19th, 2017

'Upconverted' light has a bright future: Rice University professor developing plasmon-powered devices for medicine, security, solar cells July 17th, 2017

Nature-inspired material uses liquid reinforcement: Rice U. nanoengineers create liquid-solid composites using clues from nature July 11th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project