Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > News > The Dark Side of Nanotech

July 18th, 2007

The Dark Side of Nanotech

Abstract:
As nanotechnology remains a mystery to most people—what it is and what it will do—it generates the same kind of fear of anything that is unknown.

We are given a fairly thorough catalogue of these fears in a recent blog belonging to Government Computer News.

We get this breathless revelation "normally benign materials can become toxic when nanosized because microscopic particles tend to react more readily with human tissues and other substances." The subjunctive thought coming from the "can" sounds a bit more indicative than the science may support, but in truth we don't know.

The piece makes no mention of the distinction between "manufactured" nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes versus the nanoparticles that are produced from car tires as they drive on the road, or since mankind first mastered fire. But, presumably, the author's sole concern here is evil industry producing nanomaterials that are integrated into our everyday products—like our computer mouses.

The call for more research into the toxicological issues contained within the piece is a legitimate one, and one that has been answered by both government and industry. But these calls should be made with a modicum of understanding and a healthy restraint on hysteria.

It is from pieces like this that leads me to believe that the dark side of nanotech is not the hidden harm that it could do, but how nanotech remains in the dark for most people.

Source:
blogs.spectrum.ieee.org

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Atomic imperfections move quantum communication network closer to reality June 25th, 2017

Research accelerates quest for quicker, longer-lasting electronics: UC Riverside-led research makes topological insulators magnetic well above room temperatures June 25th, 2017

Rice U. chemists create 3-D printed graphene foam June 22nd, 2017

Tiny bubbles provide tremendous propulsion in new microparticles research-Ben-Gurion U. June 21st, 2017

Environment

Enhanced photocatalytic activity by Cu2O nanoparticles integrated H2Ti3O7 nanotubes June 21st, 2017

Can crab shells provide a 'green' solution to malaria? Study shows how a mixture of chitin and silver nanoparticles inhibits growth of mosquito larvae May 12th, 2017

NanoMONITOR shares its latest developments concerning the NanoMONITOR Software and the Monitoring stations April 21st, 2017

Wood filter removes toxic dye from water April 21st, 2017

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

Tests show no nanotubes released during utilisation of nanoaugmented materials June 9th, 2017

NanoMONITOR shares its latest developments concerning the NanoMONITOR Software and the Monitoring stations April 21st, 2017

NIST updates 'sweet' 1950s separation method to clean nanoparticles from organisms January 27th, 2017

Nanoparticle exposure can awaken dormant viruses in the lungs January 17th, 2017

Human Interest/Art

Weizmann Institute of Science Presents: Weizmann Wonder Wander - 4G - is Online June 21st, 2016

Call for NanoArt and Art-Science-Technology Papers June 9th, 2016

Scientists propose non-animal tools for assessing the toxicity of nanomaterials: Particle and Fibre Toxicology publishes recommendations from expert group meeting April 26th, 2016

Are humans the new supercomputer?Today, people of all backgrounds can contribute to solving serious scientific problems by playing computer games. A Danish research group has extended the limits of quantum physics calculations and simultaneously blurred the boundaries between mac April 14th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project