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Home > News > Using technology to enhance humans

May 14th, 2007

Using technology to enhance humans

Abstract:
t's a well-known fact that technology can improve our lives. For example, we can reach anyone and anywhere with our cellphones. And people who can't walk after an accident now can have smart prosthesis to help them. But what about designing our children on a computer or having a chip inside our brain to answer our email messages? Are we ready for such a future? In "Robo-quandary," the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that many researchers are working on the subject. And as a professor of neuroscience said, "We can grow neurons on silicone plates; we can make the blind see; the deaf hear; we can read minds." So will all we become cyborgs one day?

Even if the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is quoting many researchers, I'll focus here on the research interests of Keith Bauer, an assistant professor at the Marquette University Philosophy Department. He works on "transhumanism, which addresses arguments for and against the unrestricted modification of humans by means of genetic manipulation, bio-implants and nanotechnology."

Source:
zdnet.com/

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