Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Governor says nanotechnology will brighten Oregon's future

Abstract:
State stands on "threshold of miracles" and global leadership in high tech

Governor says nanotechnology will brighten Oregon's future

Portland, OR | Posted on February 14, 2006

Governor Ted Kulongoski inspected the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute (ONAMI) at Portland State University (PSU) Monday, and told a crowd of scientists, engineers and faculty that Oregon is poised on the "threshold of miracles" made possible by an important new technology - nanotechnology.

Nanotechnology is the development and use of devices that have a size of only a few nanometers, which is smaller than many molecules.

"Nanotechnology will help us bolster our economy and extend the hope of prosperity to more people," the Governor said. "We will create new jobs for Oregonians - well-paying jobs in clean industries. We will position Oregon to take advantage of even greater opportunities in industries that have not yet been born."

The Governor led a roundtable discussion with ONAMI board members and faculty to talk about ONAMI's future, then participated in an inspection tour of the Center for Electron Microscopy and Nanofabrication on the PSU campus. After viewing a demonstration of PSU's two electron microscopes, the most advanced in the region, the Governor held a press conference with University of Oregon president Dave Frohnmayer, Oregon State University president Ed Ray, and Lindsay Desrochers, PSU's Vice President of Finance and Administration.

"Nanotechnology will play a role in solving the energy crisis by giving us ways to create, store and transport renewable energy," the Governor said. "That's worth hoping for in an age when we must rely on other nations for a fuel that pollutes our air and contributes to global warming."

He also said that nanotechnology will play a role in making materials stronger and more versatile, which is important to a world running low on critical building materials.

The PSU branch of ONAMI has begun work on research and education in nanoscale science and technology by developing particle-beam methods for fabricating and examining small structures. The Center for Electron Microscopy and Nanofabrication is also interested in carbon nanotubes, which have potential applications as biosensors, electron emitters and nanotransistors.

In 2003, Governor Kulongoski led a team that mustered $20 million in capital and another million in operating funds to start the ONAMI effort on Oregon's research campuses. Last year he place ONAMI among his highest priorities, and asked the legislature to invest $7 million more to strengthen ONAMI's capacity, which won legislative approval.

Just last week, the federal government announced its intention to invest $8 million more in ONAMI to conduct defense-related work.

####


See also the complete transcript of the Govenor's speech at PSU.

Media Contacts:
Lonn Hoklin
503.378.6169

Anna Richter Taylor
503.378.6496

Copyright © Governor's Office

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Jobs

New ASTM Standards Will Help Educate Present and Future Nanotechnology Workforces April 26th, 2015

SUNY Poly & M+W Make Major Announcement: Major Expansion To Include M+W Owned Gehrlicher Solar America Corporation That Will Create up to 400 Jobs to Develop Solar Power Plants at SUNY Poly Sites Across New York State March 26th, 2015

Is US immigration policy 'STEMming' innovation? Study sheds light on why foreign STEM students stay in US or return home March 11th, 2015

Nanotech Discoveries Move from Lab to Marketplace with Lintec Deal: Licensing Partnership Brings Together University Technology, New Richardson-Based Facility Directed by Alumni February 9th, 2015

Possible Futures

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Nature inspires first artificial molecular pump: Simple design mimics pumping mechanism of life-sustaining proteins found in living cells May 19th, 2015

NNCO and Museum of Science Fiction to Collaborate on Nanotechnology and 3D Printing Panels at Awesome Con May 19th, 2015

Quantum 'gruyères' for spintronics of the future: Topological insulators become a little less 'elusive' May 12th, 2015

Materials/Metamaterials

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles: Synthetic pieces of biological molecule form framework and glue for making nanoparticle clusters and arrays May 25th, 2015

Engineering Phase Changes in Nanoparticle Arrays: Scientists alter attractive and repulsive forces between DNA-linked particles to make dynamic, phase-shifting forms of nanomaterials May 25th, 2015

Nanostructures Increase Corrosion Resistance in Metallic Body Implants May 24th, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Announcements

Fine-tuned molecular orientation is key to more efficient solar cells May 26th, 2015

Researchers find the 'key' to quantum network solution May 25th, 2015

One step closer to a single-molecule device: Columbia Engineering researchers first to create a single-molecule diode -- the ultimate in miniaturization for electronic devices -- with potential for real-world applications May 25th, 2015

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles: Synthetic pieces of biological molecule form framework and glue for making nanoparticle clusters and arrays May 25th, 2015

Energy

Fine-tuned molecular orientation is key to more efficient solar cells May 26th, 2015

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles: Synthetic pieces of biological molecule form framework and glue for making nanoparticle clusters and arrays May 25th, 2015

Visualizing How Radiation Bombardment Boosts Superconductivity: Atomic-level flyovers show how impact sites of high-energy ions pin potentially disruptive vortices to keep high-current superconductivity flowing May 23rd, 2015

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project