Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Diamond nanotube technology promises new electronics products

Abstract:
New insight into the nature of nanodiamond

Diamond nanotube technology promises new electronics products

Argonne, IL | August 04, 2005

The newest promising material for advanced technology applications is diamond nanotubes, and research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory is giving new insight into the nature of nanodiamond.

Argonne researcher Amanda Barnard, theorist in the Center for Nanoscale Materials, is working with colleagues at two Italian universities who produced innovative diamond-coated nanotubes.

The diamond-coated tubes resemble a stick of rock candy, holding a layer of diamond 20 to 100 nm thick. A nanometer is one millionth of a millimeter. The period at the end of this sentence is about one million nanometers long. The technology in its fledgling state has already caught the eye of the electronics industry for the promise of ultra-thin televisions with cathode-ray-tube-like quality picture at a fraction of today's current flat-panel television costs.

Diamond offers an amazing array of medical and technological possibilities.

Wire molecules can be attached to it, and diamond has superior light emission properties. While diamond is an insulating material, the surface is highly electronegative. A nanodiamond coating consists of pure surface diamond. This gives a diamond-coated nanowire conductance from the nanotubes and the superior conduction from the diamond. Add to this superior light-emission properties and very low voltage requirements, and the possibility exists for very flat, low-energy displays.

''By using a more efficient conductor, nanotubes, with a more efficient field emitter, in this case nanodiamonds, you get more efficient devices,'' said Barnard. ''A lot of groups are looking for something better to make electronic displays out of, and this is just another candidate that looks very promising.''

Researchers from the University La Sapienza and the University Tor Vergata discovered the ability for a nanotube to grow nanodiamond under certain conditions in 2004, but did not know the specifics of how the diamond grew. To better understand the conditions that brought them their discovery, researchers from the group brought their discovery to Barnard.

Barnard, a postdoc from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, published her original results on the modeling of diamond nanowires in the October 2003 issue of Nano Letters. Her theories earned her the recognition of the Italian group, and she was approached in March of 2004 to help with calculations on their discovery.

''They could make them, but they couldn't understand exactly what was happening or how they were forming,'' said Barnard.''They knew what it was, they could characterize it, but they didn't know how the growth progressed.''

Barnard calculated that during the process of etching the term for the degradation of nanotubes atomic hydrogen can change the hybridization of chemical bonds between carbon atoms of a nanotube.

''Traditionally in a hydrogen environment carbon nanotubes would fall apart and disintegrate," she said, "but something different was happening. We actually established that if the amount of hydrogen present [is in correct proportion], the defects that form will nucleate into diamond before there is a chance to etch.''

These imperfections that form uniformly across the nanotube's surface allow for the bonding of diamond molecules, which then begin to grow the length of the tube. An added bonus property is that the end of the nanotube is coated with a thicker bulb of nanodiamond, and upon formation the structures stand upright without manipulation.

Barnard will leave Argonne in August for a fellowship at Oxford University, but will continue to conduct research at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, now under construction. Barnard has great expectations for the opportunities the new center will open up for nanoscale research.

''I hope that the CNM will give me more opportunity to collaborate with experimental groups,'' said Barnard. ''I am a great advocate of doing experimentally relevant theory, and the CNM will be a great place for doing that.''

####

About Argonne National Laboratory:

The nation's first national laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory conducts basic and applied scientific research across a wide spectrum of disciplines, ranging from high-energy physics to climatology and biotechnology. Since 1990, Argonne has worked with more than 600 companies and numerous federal agencies and other organizations to help advance America's scientific leadership and prepare the nation for the future. Argonne is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

For more information visit www.anl.gov


Contact:
Catherine Foster
630/252-5580
cfoster@anl.gov

Copyright Argonne National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Nanotubes/Buckyballs

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Berkeley Lab Licenses Boron Nitride Nanotube Technology: New material has unique mechanical and electronic properties September 13th, 2014

Global Energy Systems Signs Master Sales Agreement with China Aviation Supplies Group September 4th, 2014

Breakthrough for Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells: Polychiral carbon nanotube mixture absorbs more sunlight September 3rd, 2014

Announcements

Dolomite to launch Meros TCU-100 temperature controller at Lab-on-a-Chip & Microarray World Congress September 15th, 2014

Fonon at Cutting-Edge of 3D Military Printing: Live-Combat Scenarios Could See a Decisive Advantage with 3D Printing September 15th, 2014

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Simple, Cost-Effective Method Proposed for Synthesizing Zinc Oxide Nanopigments September 15th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE