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Home > News > Cavendish Kinetics’ microswitches help chips remember

August 24th, 2004

Cavendish Kinetics’ microswitches help chips remember

Micromechanical systems have finally found their way into computer memories. Of course, companies like IBM and Nanochip have proposed MEMS storage techniques before, but never for non-volatile embedded memories. In March, after four years of hushed development, Cavendish Kinetics announced its memory technology consisting of thousands of microswitches is ready to conquer the market.


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