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Home > Press > Trial by wind: Testing the heat resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites: Researchers use an arc-wind tunnel to test the heat resistance of carbon fiber reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites

Researchers from the Tokyo University of Science evaluated the utility of C/UHTCMC at temperatures above 2000 oC using arc-wind tunnel testing (pictured above). These results show degradation of the composite at high temperatures, which is an important result for the manufacture of advanced space shuttle orbiters.

CREDIT
Ryo Inoue from Tokyo University of Science, Japan
Researchers from the Tokyo University of Science evaluated the utility of C/UHTCMC at temperatures above 2000 oC using arc-wind tunnel testing (pictured above). These results show degradation of the composite at high temperatures, which is an important result for the manufacture of advanced space shuttle orbiters. CREDIT Ryo Inoue from Tokyo University of Science, Japan

Abstract:
Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon (C/C) is a composite material made of carbon fiber reinforced in a matrix of glassy carbon or graphite. It is best known as the material used in hypersonic vehicles and space shuttle orbiters, which cruise at speeds greater than Mach 5. Since the 1970s, it has also been used in the brake system in Formula One racing cars. Even though C/C has excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures and inert atmospheres, it lacks oxidation resistance in these conditions, making its widespread use limited.

Trial by wind: Testing the heat resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites: Researchers use an arc-wind tunnel to test the heat resistance of carbon fiber reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites

Tokyo, Japan | Posted on November 18th, 2022

Researchers have found that ultra-high-temperature ceramics (UHTCs), which include transition metal carbides and diborides, show good oxidation resistance. In previous studies, zirconium-titanium (Zr-Ti) alloy infiltration has shown promising results for improving the heat resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced UHTC matrix composites (C/UHTCMCs). However, their use at high temperatures (>2000 oC) is not known.

Set against this backdrop, a group of researchers from Japan have evaluated the potential utility of Zr-Ti alloy-infiltrated C/UHTCMCs at temperatures above 2000 oC. Their study, led by Junior Associate Professor Ryo Inoue from Tokyo University of Science (TUS), was published in the Journal of Materials Science and made available online on October 27, 2022. The research team consisted of Mr. Noriatsu Koide and Assistant Professor Yutaro Arai from TUS, Professor Makoto Hasegawa from Yokohama National University, and Dr. Toshiyuki Nishimura from the National Institute for Materials Science.

Speaking of the motivation behind their study, “The research is an extension of the research and development of ceramics and ceramics-based composite materials. In recent years, we have received inquiries from several manufacturers of heavy industries regarding materials that can be used at temperatures above 2000 °C. We have also started to work with these manufacturers to develop new materials,” says Prof. Inoue.

The C/UHTCMC was manufactured using melt infiltration, which is the most cost-effective way to fabricate these materials. To study the applicability of this material, three types of C/UHTCMCs were fabricated with three different alloy compositions. The three alloy compositions used had varying atomic ratios of Zr:Ti. To characterize the heat resistance, the team used a method called arc-wind tunnel testing. This method involves exposing the material to extremely high enthalpy airflow inside a tunnel, similar to conditions that spacecrafts experience while re-entering the atmosphere.

The team found that the amount of Zr in the alloy had a strong effect on the degradation of the composite for all temperatures. This is owing to the thermodynamic preference for the oxidation of Zr-rich carbides compared to Ti-rich carbides. Further, the Zr and Ti oxides formed on the composite surface prevented further oxidation, and the oxide composition depended on the composition of the infiltrated alloys. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the oxides formed on the composite surface were composed of ZrO2, ZrTiO4, and TiO2 solid solutions.

At temperatures above 2000 oC, the thickness and weight of the samples increased with the Zr content of the composites after the arc-wind tunnel tests. The team also observed that the melting point of the surface oxides increased as the Zr content increased. For temperatures above 2600 oC, the only oxides formed were liquid-phase, requiring a thermodynamic design of the matrix composition to prevent the recession of UHTC composites.

“We have successfully studied the degradation of C/UHTCMC at temperatures above 2000 oC using thermodynamic analysis. We have also shown that the matrix design needs modification to prevent the degradation of the composites. Our research has the potential to contribute to the realization of ultra-high-speed passenger aircraft, re-entry vehicle, and other hypersonic vehicles,” concludes Prof. Inoue.

These results could have important consequences in the production of advanced space shuttle orbiters and high-speed vehicles.

####

About Tokyo University of Science
Tokyo University of Science (TUS) is a well-known and respected university, and the largest science-specialized private research university in Japan, with four campuses in central Tokyo and its suburbs and in Hokkaido. Established in 1881, the university has continually contributed to Japan's development in science through inculcating the love for science in researchers, technicians, and educators.

With a mission of “Creating science and technology for the harmonious development of nature, human beings, and society", TUS has undertaken a wide range of research from basic to applied science. TUS has embraced a multidisciplinary approach to research and undertaken intensive study in some of today's most vital fields. TUS is a meritocracy where the best in science is recognized and nurtured. It is the only private university in Japan that has produced a Nobel Prize winner and the only private university in Asia to produce Nobel Prize winners within the natural sciences field.

Website: https://www.tus.ac.jp/en/mediarelations/



About Junior Associate Professor Ryo Inoue from Tokyo University of Science
Dr Ryo Inoue obtained a PhD degree from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 2014, and worked there for a year as a project researcher. He joined the Tokyo University of Science in 2015 as an Assistant Professor of the Department of Materials Science and Technology. He now leads the Inoue Laboratory as a Junior Associate Professor of the Department of mechanical Engineering, where he develops and studies composite materials for automobiles, aircrafts, and research. He has 92 publications credited to him and 649 citations to his name.

Funding information
This study was partially supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI (Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research), Grant Number 21K18782, and JSPS KAKENHI (Grant-in-Aid for Early Career Scientists), Grant Number 22K14152.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Hiroshi Matsuda
Tokyo University of Science

Copyright © Tokyo University of Science

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