Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Better understanding superconductors with Higgs spectroscopy Prof. Stefan Kaiser from TU Dresden awarded ERC Consolidator Grant

Abstract:
Superconductivity is a macroscopic quantum state characterized by the disappearance of electrical resistance in materials at extremely low temperatures. Electrical currents can therefore flow through it without a constant drive being present. This is a promising property, especially for energy transmission. Because superconductivity generates very large magnetic fields, it is already being used in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners. Superconductivity also plays an important role in the race to develop quantum computers.

Better understanding superconductors with Higgs spectroscopy Prof. Stefan Kaiser from TU Dresden awarded ERC Consolidator Grant

Dresden, Germany | Posted on March 18th, 2022

The physical processes behind it, however, are difficult for non-physicists to grasp. Stefan Kaiser, professor of Ultrafast Solid State Physics and Photonics at TU Dresden, describes the phenomenon as a "fascinating but physically complex problem." His research area of high-temperature superconductors, in particular, initially seems rather odd to people unfamiliar with the subject.

Kaiser himself is fascinated by the complex field of science, the many unsolved questions and, above all, the great potential of these materials. "To understand superconductors, you have to understand how electrons combine at very low temperatures to form so-called "Cooper pairs" as superconducting charge carriers. In quantum mechanics, we can describe the totality of all these Cooper pairs by a wave function. However, to completely characterize this "wave", we have had to use many indirect methods in which Cooper pairs are broken back into electrons. In the "T-Higgs" project, we are now using terahertz lasers to specifically induce the natural oscillations of this "wave", the so-called Higgs oscillations. From the way the "wave" oscillates, we can now directly measure the properties of the superconductor with our new spectroscopy and thus gain a deeper understanding of how the superconductor behaves," Kaiser explains.

For this ambitious project, the physicist received the ERC Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council with a total volume of over two million euros for five years. The funding is part of the EU's Horizon Europe program.

"In my career, I have been involved in many aspects of superconductivity and a significant part of my research deals in particular with optical control of superconductivity with fast ultrashort laser pulses. This includes light-induced superconductivity, which is possible for a short time even at room temperature. Here, the scientific community is now asking whether and how this light-induced non-equilibrium phenomenon is linked to superconductivity at equilibrium and how it can be characterized. The ERC grant will now allow me to develop Higgs spectroscopy as a new method and assemble a team that will answer this exciting question. We would like to establish the Higgs mode as a new criterion for superconductivity. In addition, we will apply the new Higgs spectroscopy to many important types of superconductors and also use it to directly identify and fully characterize new superconductors that are still unknown," Kaiser explains his project plans.

The European Research Council is part of the EU’s framework program for research and innovation entitled “Horizon Europe”. It funds individual, excellent scientists. As part of the “Consolidator Grant” funding line, projects are funded with 2 million euros (plus up to another million euros for certain additional costs) over five years. 313 researchers are currently benefitting from the program, 61 of whom in Germany. Recently, further TUD researchers were able to win over the European Research Council (ERC) with their outstanding work and secure grants in various funding programs. Among them are Dr. Erika Covi from NaMLab and Prof. Michael Siewke from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD).

NaMLab researcher secures ERC Starting Grant

Technology permeates our lives and our daily routines: a multitude of smart, interconnected devices on the edge of the grid help us to perform our daily tasks. However, to meet the stringent power and memory constraints of these devices and enable them to learn and collaborate from their experiences, a radical paradigm shift beyond current Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology is required.
In MEMRINESS, Memristive Neurons and Synapses for Neuromorphic Edge Computing, Dr. Erika Covi and her team will exploit the physical properties of emerging memristive devices to develop neurons and synapses that provide the necessary brain-inspired primitives to create low-power, memory-efficient smart edge devices that can learn online and collaboratively. The newly developed neurons and synapses will be validated in a hardwire spiking neural network and in three collaborative scenarios of increasing complexity.
The European Research Council is supporting this groundbreaking research project at NaMLab. ERC Starting Grants support excellent researchers at the stage in their career where they are establishing their own independent research team or program. Dr. Covi will receive the five-year grant of up to €1.5 million to conduct her research.

Fighting tumors with macrophages: ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Prof. Michael Sieweke

High hopes are placed on new cell therapies to fight cancer but existing treatments are not effective for solid tumors. Prof. Michael Sieweke and his group at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden want to overcome this problem by using macrophages, specific immune cells that can infiltrate and attack solid tumors. The project was just funded by the Proof of Concept Grant from the European Research Council (ERC), a translational project that grew out of the basic research of Prof. Michael Sieweke’s ERC advanced grant aiming at rejuvenating macrophages and fighting diseases of old age, including cancer.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Rick Glöckner
TU Dresden, European Project Center

Office: +49 351 463-32879
Expert Contact

Prof. Stefan Kaiser
TU Dresden, Faculty of Physics, Chair of Ultrafast Solid State Physics and Photonics

Copyright © TU Dresden

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon November 18th, 2022

Researchers at Purdue unlock light-matter interactions on sub-nanometer scales, leading to ‘picophotonics’ November 18th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Physics

A new experiment pushes the boundaries of our understanding of topological quantum matter: The behavior of bosonic particles observed in a magnetic insulator fabricated from ruthenium chloride can be explained by a relatively new and little-studied physics phenomenon called the B November 18th, 2022

Milestones achieved on the path to useful quantum technologies: Researchers at Paderborn and Ulm universities are developing the first programmable optical quantum memory October 7th, 2022

Master equation to boost quantum technologies: FQXi-funded analysis will help physicists exert exquisitely precise real-time feedback control over quantum systems August 26th, 2022

Superconductivity

New hybrid structures could pave the way to more stable quantum computers: Study shows that merging a topological insulator with a monolayer superconductor could support theorized topological superconductivity October 28th, 2022

NIST’s superconducting hardware could scale up brain-inspired computing October 7th, 2022

The “dense” potential of nanostructured superconductors: Scientists use unconventional spark plasma sintering method to prepare highly dense superconducting bulk magnesium diboride with a high current density October 7th, 2022

Imaging

New technique allows researchers to scrape beyond the surface of nanomaterials: Using a new secondary-ion mass spectrometry technique, research are getting a fresh look at MXenes and MAX phases September 23rd, 2022

Silicon image sensor that computes: Device speeds up, simplifies image processing for autonomous vehicles and other applications August 26th, 2022

Dielectric metalens speed up the development of miniaturized imaging systems August 26th, 2022

Possible Futures

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon November 18th, 2022

NIST’s grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies November 18th, 2022

A new experiment pushes the boundaries of our understanding of topological quantum matter: The behavior of bosonic particles observed in a magnetic insulator fabricated from ruthenium chloride can be explained by a relatively new and little-studied physics phenomenon called the B November 18th, 2022

Trial by wind: Testing the heat resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites: Researchers use an arc-wind tunnel to test the heat resistance of carbon fiber reinforced ultra-high-temperature ceramic matrix composites November 18th, 2022

Quantum Computing

NIST’s grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies November 18th, 2022

Linearly assembled Ag-Cu nanoclusters: Spin transfer and distance-dependent spin coupling November 4th, 2022

Novel nanowire fabrication technique paves way for next generation spintronics November 4th, 2022

New $1.25 million research project will map materials at the nanoscale: The work can lead to new catalysts and other compounds that could be applicable in a range of areas including quantum science, renewable energy, life sciences and sustainability October 28th, 2022

Discoveries

An on-chip time-lens generates ultrafast pulses: New device opens the doors to applications in communication, quantum computing, astronomy November 18th, 2022

Researchers at Purdue unlock light-matter interactions on sub-nanometer scales, leading to ‘picophotonics’ November 18th, 2022

Rice turns asphaltene into graphene for composites: ‘Flashed’ byproduct of crude oil could bolster materials, polymer inks November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

Announcements

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon November 18th, 2022

NIST’s grid of quantum islands could reveal secrets for powerful technologies November 18th, 2022

A new experiment pushes the boundaries of our understanding of topological quantum matter: The behavior of bosonic particles observed in a magnetic insulator fabricated from ruthenium chloride can be explained by a relatively new and little-studied physics phenomenon called the B November 18th, 2022

How “2D” materials expand: New technique that accurately measures how atom-thin materials expand when heated could help engineers develop faster, more powerful electronic devices November 18th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project