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Home > Press > Mass production of revolutionary computer memory moves closer with ULTRARAM™ on silicon wafers for the first time

ULTRARAM™ is a novel type of memory with extraordinary properties

CREDIT
Manus Hayne, Lancaster University
ULTRARAM™ is a novel type of memory with extraordinary properties CREDIT Manus Hayne, Lancaster University

Abstract:
A pioneering type of patented computer memory known as ULTRARAM™ has been demonstrated on silicon wafers in what is a major step towards its large-scale manufacture.

Mass production of revolutionary computer memory moves closer with ULTRARAM™ on silicon wafers for the first time

Lancaster, UK | Posted on January 7th, 2022

ULTRARAM™ is a novel type of memory with extraordinary properties. It combines the non-volatility of a data storage memory, like flash, with the speed, energy-efficiency and endurance of a working memory, like DRAM. To do this it utilises the unique properties of compound semiconductors, commonly used in photonic devices such as LEDS, laser diodes and infrared detectors, but not in digital electronics, which is the preserve of silicon.

Initially patented in the US, further patents on the technology are currently being progressed in key technology markets around the world.

Now, in a collaboration between the Physics and Engineering Departments at Lancaster University and the Department of Physics at Warwick, ULTRARAM™ has been implemented on silicon wafers for the very first time.

Professor Manus Hayne of the Department of Physics at Lancaster, who leads the work said, “ULTRARAM™ on silicon is a huge advance for our research, overcoming very significant materials challenges of large crystalline lattice mismatch, the change from elemental to compound semiconductor and differences in thermal contraction.”

Digital electronics, which is the core of all gadgetry from smart watches and smart phones through to personal computers and datacentres, uses processor and memory chips made from the semiconductor element silicon.

Due to the maturity of the silicon chip-making industry and the multi-billion dollar cost of building chip factories, implementation of any digital electronic technology on silicon wafers is essential for its commercialisation.

Remarkably, the ULTRARAM™ on silicon devices actually outperform previous incarnations of the technology on GaAs compound semiconductor wafers, demonstrating (extrapolated) data storage times of at least 1000 years, fast switching speed (for device size) and program-erase cycling endurance of at least 10 million, which is one hundred to one thousand times better than flash.

The research is reported in the journal Advanced Electronic Materials.

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For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Gillian Whitworth
Lancaster University

Office: 01-524-592-612

Copyright © Lancaster University

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