Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > A single molecule makes a big splash in the understanding of the two types of water

A collaborative team led by researchers from Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo uses a single water molecule in a C60 cage to probe quantum mechanics

CREDIT
Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo
A collaborative team led by researchers from Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo uses a single water molecule in a C60 cage to probe quantum mechanics CREDIT Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo

Abstract:
It plays a fundamental role in human existence and is a major component of our universe, yet there are still things we don’t understand about water. To address the knowledge gaps, a collaborative team of Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Kyoto University, and Tohoku University investigated electron transport through a single water molecule in a C60 cage. Their findings are published in Nano Letters.

A single molecule makes a big splash in the understanding of the two types of water

Tokyo, Japan | Posted on January 7th, 2022

Simple systems are often the best starting point for determining complex information. A single water molecule is one such system. Made up of just three atoms, it provides an excellent model for establishing quantum mechanical information.

Introducing a water molecule into a C60 cage—a soccer ball-shaped molecule made entirely of carbon atoms—gives and is an excellent way of isolating water for investigation. The researchers achieved this using “molecular surgery”, which involves opening the cage, injecting water, and closing the cage again.

was then used as a single molecule transistor (SMT) by mounting one molecule in the very small gap—less than 1 nm—between two gold electrodes. Because the electric current then passes through the isolated molecule only, the electron transport can be studied with high specificity.

A conductance map, also known as a “Coulomb stability diagram”, was generated for the SMT. It showed multiple tunneling-induced excited states for the water molecule. In contrast, the Coulomb stability diagram of an empty C60 cage SMT showed only two excited states.

“Because it contains two hydrogen atoms, water has two different nuclear spin states: ortho- and para-water. In ortho-water the hydrogen nuclear spins are in the same direction, while in para-water they are opposite to one another,” explains study lead author Shaoqing Du. “Understanding the transition between these two types of water is an important area of research.”

The researchers measured tunneling spectra for the system and, by comparing the findings with theoretical calculations, were able to attribute the measured conductance peaks to rotational and vibrational excitations of the water molecule. They also investigated using terahertz spectroscopy and the results agreed with the tunneling spectroscopy data.

Both techniques showed quantum rotational excitations of ortho- and para-water simultaneously. This demonstrates that the single water molecule transitioned between the two nuclear isomers (ortho- and para-water) within the timeframe of the experiment, which was approximately one minute.

“Our findings make an important contribution to the understanding of ortho-para fluctuation in water molecules,” says study corresponding author Kazuhiko Hirakawa. “Because water plays such an important role in chemistry and biology, and even in understanding our universe, we expect our findings to have a wide-ranging impact.”

####

About Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo
Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo is one of the largest university-attached research institutes in Japan.

More than 120 research laboratories, each headed by a faculty member, comprise IIS, with more than 1,200 members including approximately 400 staff and 800 students actively engaged in education and research. Our activities cover almost all the areas of engineering disciplines. Since its foundation in 1949, IIS has worked to bridge the huge gaps that exist between academic disciplines and realworld applications.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Kazuhiko Hirakawa
Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Office: 81-3-5452-6260

Copyright © Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The study, “Inelastic Electron Transport and Ortho−Para Fluctuation of Water Molecule in H2O@C60 Single Molecule Transistors”, was published in Nano Letters at DOI:

Related News Press

News and information

Bioengineered nanoparticles show promise for fibrinogen manufacture, says Journal of Pharmaceutical Analysis study: Scientists engineer a nanoparticle polymer that can selectively bind to fibrinogen in human plasma, presenting a pathway for improved drug development January 14th, 2022

Photon recycling – The key to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells January 14th, 2022

NSF funds Rice effort to measure, preserve quantum entanglement: Physicist Guido Pagano wins CAREER Award to develop tools for quantum computing January 14th, 2022

Tuning the bonds of paired quantum particles to create dissipationless flow: A tunable platform made from atomically thin materials may help researchers figure out how to create a robust quantum condensate that can flow without losing energy January 14th, 2022

Physics

NSF funds Rice effort to measure, preserve quantum entanglement: Physicist Guido Pagano wins CAREER Award to develop tools for quantum computing January 14th, 2022

Tuning the bonds of paired quantum particles to create dissipationless flow: A tunable platform made from atomically thin materials may help researchers figure out how to create a robust quantum condensate that can flow without losing energy January 14th, 2022

Possible Futures

Towards high-performance organic optoelectronics with better crystallinity at semiconductor interface: Organic molecular interfaces with minimized structural mismatch and spontaneous electron transfer could open doors to high-efficiency optoelectronics January 14th, 2022

New photonic effect could speed drug development: Twisted semiconductor nanostructures convert red light into the twisted blue light in tiny volumes, which may help develop chiral drugs January 14th, 2022

UT Southwestern develops nanotherapeutic to ward off liver cancer January 14th, 2022

The free-energy principle explains the brain January 14th, 2022

Chip Technology

Towards high-performance organic optoelectronics with better crystallinity at semiconductor interface: Organic molecular interfaces with minimized structural mismatch and spontaneous electron transfer could open doors to high-efficiency optoelectronics January 14th, 2022

Intense monocycle terahertz pulses from shifting electrons in quantum structures January 7th, 2022

Researchers detect two-dimensional kagome surface states January 7th, 2022

Mass production of revolutionary computer memory moves closer with ULTRARAM™ on silicon wafers for the first time January 7th, 2022

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Researchers use electron microscope to turn nanotube into tiny transistor December 24th, 2021

Nanotube fibers stand strong -- but for how long? Rice scientists calculate how carbon nanotubes and their fibers experience fatigue December 24th, 2021

Graphene nanotubes offer an efficient replacement for carbon additives in conductive electrical heating paints November 3rd, 2021

Graphene nanotubes provide a shortcut to add conductivity to powder coatings October 1st, 2021

Discoveries

Towards high-performance organic optoelectronics with better crystallinity at semiconductor interface: Organic molecular interfaces with minimized structural mismatch and spontaneous electron transfer could open doors to high-efficiency optoelectronics January 14th, 2022

Bioengineered nanoparticles show promise for fibrinogen manufacture, says Journal of Pharmaceutical Analysis study: Scientists engineer a nanoparticle polymer that can selectively bind to fibrinogen in human plasma, presenting a pathway for improved drug development January 14th, 2022

UT Southwestern develops nanotherapeutic to ward off liver cancer January 14th, 2022

The free-energy principle explains the brain January 14th, 2022

Announcements

Nanostructures get complex with electron equivalents: Nanoparticles of two different sizes break away from symmetrical designs January 14th, 2022

New photonic effect could speed drug development: Twisted semiconductor nanostructures convert red light into the twisted blue light in tiny volumes, which may help develop chiral drugs January 14th, 2022

UT Southwestern develops nanotherapeutic to ward off liver cancer January 14th, 2022

The free-energy principle explains the brain January 14th, 2022

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Photon recycling – The key to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells January 14th, 2022

Tuning the bonds of paired quantum particles to create dissipationless flow: A tunable platform made from atomically thin materials may help researchers figure out how to create a robust quantum condensate that can flow without losing energy January 14th, 2022

Nanostructures get complex with electron equivalents: Nanoparticles of two different sizes break away from symmetrical designs January 14th, 2022

New photonic effect could speed drug development: Twisted semiconductor nanostructures convert red light into the twisted blue light in tiny volumes, which may help develop chiral drugs January 14th, 2022

Water

Water as a metal July 30th, 2021

Researchers develop new graphene nanochannel water filters January 22nd, 2021

Controlling the nanoscale structure of membranes is key for clean water, researchers find January 1st, 2021

Ultra-fast gas flows through tiniest holes in 2D membranes: Researchers from the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester and the University of Pennsylvania identify ultra-fast gas flows through atomic-scale apertures in 2D membrane and validate a century-old e December 18th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project