Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Best of both worlds—Combining classical and quantum systems to meet supercomputing demands: Scientists detect strongly entangled pair of protons on a nanocrystalline silicon surface, potentially enabling new levels of high-speed computing

This study shows how quantum entanglement displays a huge energy difference between its states unlike those of molecular hydrogen, promising ultra-fast processing in the order of 106 qubits and atom teleportation (H1H4)

CREDIT
Takahiro Matsumoto from NCU, Japan
This study shows how quantum entanglement displays a huge energy difference between its states unlike those of molecular hydrogen, promising ultra-fast processing in the order of 106 qubits and atom teleportation (H1H4) CREDIT Takahiro Matsumoto from NCU, Japan

Abstract:
One of the most interesting phenomena in quantum mechanics is “quantum entanglement.” This phenomenon describes how certain particles are inextricably linked, such that their states can only be described with reference to each other. This particle interaction also forms the basis of quantum computing. And this is why, in recent years, physicists have looked for techniques to generate entanglement. However, these techniques confront a number of engineering hurdles, including limitations in creating large number of “qubits” (quantum bits, the basic unit of quantum information), the need to maintain extremely low temperatures (<1 K), and the use of ultrapure materials. Surfaces or interfaces are crucial in the formation of quantum entanglement. Unfortunately, electrons confined to surfaces are prone to “decoherence”, a condition in which there is no defined phase relationship between the two distinct states. Thus, to obtain stable, coherent qubits, the spin states of surface atoms (or equivalently, protons) must be determined.

Best of both worlds—Combining classical and quantum systems to meet supercomputing demands: Scientists detect strongly entangled pair of protons on a nanocrystalline silicon surface, potentially enabling new levels of high-speed computing

Nagoya City, Japan | Posted on August 13th, 2021

Recently, a team of scientists in Japan, including Prof. Takahiro Matsumoto from Nagoya City University, Prof. Hidehiko Sugimoto from Chuo University, Dr. Takashi Ohhara from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, and Dr. Susumu Ikeda from High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, recognized the need for stable qubits. By looking at the surface spin states, the scientists discovered an entangled pair of protons on the surface of a silicon nanocrystal.

Prof. Matsumoto, the lead scientist, outlines the significance of their study, “Proton entanglement has been previously observed in molecular hydrogen and plays an important role in a variety of scientific disciplines. However, the entangled state was found in gas or liquid phases only. Now, we have detected quantum entanglement on a solid surface, which can lay the groundwork for future quantum technologies.” Their pioneering study was published in a recent issue of Physical Review B.

The scientists studied the spin states using a technique known as “inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy” to determine the nature of surface vibrations. By modeling these surface atoms as “harmonic oscillators,” they showed anti-symmetry of protons. Since the protons were identical (or indistinguishable), the oscillator model restricted their possible spin states, resulting in strong entanglement. Compared to the proton entanglement in molecular hydrogen, the entanglement harbored a massive energy difference between its states, ensuring its longevity and stability. Additionally, the scientists theoretically demonstrated a cascade transition of terahertz entangled photon pairs using the proton entanglement.

The confluence of proton qubits with contemporary silicon technology could result in an organic union of classical and quantum computing platforms, enabling a much larger number of qubits (106) than currently available (102), and ultra-fast processing for new supercomputing applications. “Quantum computers can handle intricate problems, such as integer factorization and the ‘traveling salesman problem,’ which are virtually impossible to solve with traditional supercomputers. This could be a game-changer in quantum computing with regard to storing, processing, and transferring data, potentially even leading to a paradigm shift in pharmaceuticals, data security, and many other areas,” concludes an optimistic Prof. Matsumoto.

We could be on the verge of witnessing a technological revolution in quantum computing!

####

About Nagoya City University
Nagoya City University (NCU), a public university established in 1950, began with the Medical School and the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Its origins, however, stretch back to the Nagoya School of Pharmacy, founded in 1884, and the Nagoya Municipal Women's Higher Medical School, founded in 1943. NCU has grown into an urban-style public university in the center of Nagoya, Japan, with around 4,000 students and 1,600 faculty members. In the last 60 years, NCU has graduated over 26,000 students. NCU continues to expand as an advanced education and research center to assist in the improvement of local health and welfare, as well as the development of the local economy and culture.

Website: https://www.nagoya-cu.ac.jp/english/



About Professor Takahiro Matsumoto from Nagoya City University, Japan

Dr. Takahiro Matsumoto has been a Professor at the Graduate School of Design and Architecture at Nagoya City University (NCU) since 2015. He received his PhD from the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and worked as a researcher for nearly 12 years at Nippon Steel Corporation and the Japan Science and Technology Agency. Prior to joining NCU, he also worked as a Chief Engineer at Stanley Electric Co., Ltd. for over 4 years. His research interests include optical physics, quantum electronics, and nanomaterials. He has co-authored 4 books and over 100 papers. Prof. Matsumoto has acquired over 200 industrial patents for his outstanding research work.



Funding information

This study was financially supported by JSPS KAKENHI grant no. 20H04455.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sone Yasunobu

Office: 81-528-538-329
Expert Contact

Takahiro Matsumoto

Copyright © Nagoya City University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Reference

Related News Press

Quantum Physics

Photon-pair source with pump rejection filter fabricated on single CMOS chip: New integrated source provides critical component for chip-based quantum photonic systems October 15th, 2021

Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption: Asst Prof Kang Hao Cheong and his research team from SUTD have set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption October 15th, 2021

Inspired by photosynthesis, scientists double reaction quantum efficiency October 1st, 2021

Switching on a superfluid: Exotic phase transitions unlock pathways to future, superfluid-based technologies September 24th, 2021

News and information

Intelligent optical chip to improve telecommunications: An INRS team uses autonomous learning approaches for optical waveform generators to boost optical signal processing functionalities for current and future telecom applications October 15th, 2021

Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption: Asst Prof Kang Hao Cheong and his research team from SUTD have set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption October 15th, 2021

Cellular environments shape molecular architecture: Researchers glean a more complete picture of a structure called the nuclear pore complex by studying it directly inside cells October 15th, 2021

Physics

Scientists discover spin polarization induced by shear flow October 1st, 2021

Switching on a superfluid: Exotic phase transitions unlock pathways to future, superfluid-based technologies September 24th, 2021

Superconductivity

A kagome lattice superconductor reveals a “cascade” of quantum electron states: In a rare non-magnetic kagome material, a topological metal cools into a superconductor through a sequence of novel charge density waves October 1st, 2021

Fabricating MgB2 superconductors using spark plasma sintering and pulse magnetization: New research suggests that highly dense MgB2 bulks have improved mechanical and superconducting properties September 24th, 2021

Possible Futures

Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption: Asst Prof Kang Hao Cheong and his research team from SUTD have set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption October 15th, 2021

Cellular environments shape molecular architecture: Researchers glean a more complete picture of a structure called the nuclear pore complex by studying it directly inside cells October 15th, 2021

How to program DNA robots to poke and prod cell membranes: A discovery of how to build little blocks out of DNA and get them to stick to lipids has implications for biosensing and mRNA vaccines October 15th, 2021

Molecular Sciences Software Institute receives $15 million grant from National Science Foundation October 15th, 2021

Quantum Computing

Photon-pair source with pump rejection filter fabricated on single CMOS chip: New integrated source provides critical component for chip-based quantum photonic systems October 15th, 2021

Fujitsu and Osaka University deepen collaborative research and development for fault-tolerant quantum computers October 1st, 2021

Two-dimensional hybrid metal halide device allows control of terahertz emissions October 1st, 2021

Researchers use breakthrough method to answer key question about electron states September 24th, 2021

Discoveries

Intelligent optical chip to improve telecommunications: An INRS team uses autonomous learning approaches for optical waveform generators to boost optical signal processing functionalities for current and future telecom applications October 15th, 2021

Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption: Asst Prof Kang Hao Cheong and his research team from SUTD have set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption October 15th, 2021

Cellular environments shape molecular architecture: Researchers glean a more complete picture of a structure called the nuclear pore complex by studying it directly inside cells October 15th, 2021

How to program DNA robots to poke and prod cell membranes: A discovery of how to build little blocks out of DNA and get them to stick to lipids has implications for biosensing and mRNA vaccines October 15th, 2021

Announcements

Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption: Asst Prof Kang Hao Cheong and his research team from SUTD have set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption October 15th, 2021

Cellular environments shape molecular architecture: Researchers glean a more complete picture of a structure called the nuclear pore complex by studying it directly inside cells October 15th, 2021

How to program DNA robots to poke and prod cell membranes: A discovery of how to build little blocks out of DNA and get them to stick to lipids has implications for biosensing and mRNA vaccines October 15th, 2021

Molecular Sciences Software Institute receives $15 million grant from National Science Foundation October 15th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Intelligent optical chip to improve telecommunications: An INRS team uses autonomous learning approaches for optical waveform generators to boost optical signal processing functionalities for current and future telecom applications October 15th, 2021

Using quantum Parrondo’s random walks for encryption: Asst Prof Kang Hao Cheong and his research team from SUTD have set out to apply concepts from quantum Parrondo’s paradox in search of a working protocol for semiclassical encryption October 15th, 2021

Cellular environments shape molecular architecture: Researchers glean a more complete picture of a structure called the nuclear pore complex by studying it directly inside cells October 15th, 2021

How to program DNA robots to poke and prod cell membranes: A discovery of how to build little blocks out of DNA and get them to stick to lipids has implications for biosensing and mRNA vaccines October 15th, 2021

Quantum nanoscience

Two-dimensional hybrid metal halide device allows control of terahertz emissions October 1st, 2021

Engineering various sources of loss provides new features for perfect light absorption: "Loss is ubiquitous in nature, and by better understanding it, we make it more useful" September 10th, 2021

Tapping into magnets to clamp down on noise in quantum information September 9th, 2021

Researchers use gold film to enhance quantum sensing with qubits in a 2D material September 3rd, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project