Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors

Photo: modified rGO supercapacitor electrodes
Photo: modified rGO supercapacitor electrodes

Abstract:
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with colleagues from the University of Lille (Lille, France) synthetized a new material based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for supercapacitors, energy storage devices. The rGO modification method with the use of organic molecules, derivatives of hypervalent iodine, allowed obtaining a material that stores 1.7 times more electrical energy. The research findings are published in Electrochimica Acta academic journal (IF: 6,215; Q1).

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors

Tomsk, Russia | Posted on January 19th, 2021

A supercapacitor is an electrochemical device for storage and release of electric charge. Unlike batteries, they store and release energy several times faster and do not contain lithium.

A supercapacitor is an element with two electrodes separated by an organic or inorganic electrolyte. The electrodes are coated with an electric charge accumulating material. The modern trend in science is to use various materials based on graphene, one of the thinnest and most durable materials known to man. The researchers of TPU and the University of Lille used reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a cheap and available material.

"Despite their potential, supercapacitors are not wide-spread yet. For further development of the technology, it is required to enhance the efficiency of supercapacitors. One of the key challenges here is to increase the energy capacity.

It can be achieved by expanding the surface area of an energy storage material, rGO in this particular case. We found a simple and quite fast method. We used exceptionally organic molecules under mild conditions and did not use expensive and toxic metals," Pavel Postnikov, Associate Professor of TPU Research School of Chemistry and Applied Biomedical Science and the research supervisor says.

Reduced graphene oxide in a powder form is deposited on electrodes. As a result, the electrode becomes coated with hundreds of nanoscale layers of the substance. The layers tend to agglomerate, in other words, to sinter. To expand the surface area of a material, the interlayer spacing should be increased.

"For this purpose, we modified rGO with organic molecules, which resulted in the interlayer spacing increase. Insignificant differences in interlayer spacing allowed increasing energy capacity of the material by 1.7 times. That is, 1 g of the new material can store 1.7 times more energy in comparison with a pristine reduced graphene oxide," Elizaveta Sviridova, Junior Research Fellow of TPU Research School of Chemistry and Applied Biomedical Sciences and one of the authors of the article explains.

The reaction proceeded through the formation of active arynes from iodonium salts. They kindle scientists` interest due to their property to form a single layer of new organic groups on material surfaces. The TPU researchers have been developing the chemistry of iodonium salts for many years.

"The modification reaction proceeds under mild conditions by simply mixing the solution of iodonium salt with reduced graphene oxide. If we compare it with other methods of reduced graphene oxide functionalization, we have achieved the highest indicators of material energy capacity increase," Elizaveta Sviridova says.

###

The research work was conducted with the support of the Russian Science Foundation.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Alina Borovskaia

7-923-419-5528

@TPUnews_en

Copyright © Tomsk Polytechnic University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files IND to Begin Phase 2b Study of ARO-APOC3 in Patients with Severe Hypertriglyceridemia March 2nd, 2021

Quantum quirk yields giant magnetic effect, where none should exist: Study opens window into the landscape of extreme topological matter March 1st, 2021

Bioinformatics tool accurately tracks synthetic: DNA Computer scientists show benefits of bioinformatics with PlasmidHawk February 26th, 2021

Possible Futures

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Discoveries

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Announcements

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Atomic nuclei in the quantum swing: The extremely precise control of nuclear excitations opens up possibilities of ultra-precise atomic clocks and powerful nuclear batteries February 19th, 2021

From heat to spin to electricity: Understanding spin transport in thermoelectric devices: Scientists shed light on how the magnetic properties of 2D interlayers can enhance spin accumulation effects in thermoelectric heterostructures January 29th, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project