Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Researchers develop new way to break reciprocity law: The breakthrough makes a significant step forward in photonics and microwave technology by eliminating the need for bulky magnets

One-way light transmission.

CREDIT
Xuchen Wang / Aalto University
One-way light transmission. CREDIT Xuchen Wang / Aalto University

Abstract:
An international research team lead by Aalto University has found a new and simple route to break the reciprocity law in the electromagnetic world, by changing material properties periodically in time. The breakthrough could help to create efficient nonreciprocal devices, such as compact isolators and circulators, that are needed for the next generation of microwave and optical communications systems.

Researchers develop new way to break reciprocity law: The breakthrough makes a significant step forward in photonics and microwave technology by eliminating the need for bulky magnets

Aalto, Finland | Posted on December 29th, 2020

When we look through a window and see our neighbour on the street, the neighbour can also see us. This is called reciprocity, and it is the most common physical phenomenon in nature. Electromagnetic signals propagating between two sources is always governed by reciprocity law: if the signal from source A can be received by source B, then the signal from source B can also be received by source A with equal efficiency.

Researchers from Aalto University, Stanford University, and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) have successfully demonstrated that the reciprocity law can be broken if the property of the propagation medium periodically changes in time. Propagation medium refers to a material in which light and electromagnetic waves survive and propagate from one point to another.

The team theoretically demonstrated that, if the medium is shaped into an asymmetric structure and its physical property varies globally in time, the signal generated by source A can be received by source B but not the other way around. This creates a strong nonreciprocal effect, since the signal from Source B cannot be received by source A.

'This is an important milestone in both the physics and engineering communities. We need one-way light transmission for a variety of applications, like stabilising laser operation or designing future communication systems, such as full-duplex systems with increased channel capacity,' says postdoctoral researcher Xuchen Wang from Aalto University.

Previously, creating a nonreciprocal effect has required external magnets biasing, which makes devices bulky, temperature unstable, and sometimes incompatible with other components. The new findings provide the simplest and most compact way to break electromagnetic reciprocity, without the need of bulky and heavy magnets.

'Such "time-only" variations allow us to design simple and compact material platforms capable of one-way light transmission and even amplification,' Xuchen explains.

The results are reported in Physical Review Letters on 22 December 2020. The study has received funding from the Academy of Finland, European Union's Horizon 2020 Future Emerging Technologies call (FETOPEN - RIA) under project VISORSURF, the Finnish Foundation for Technology Promotion, and the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research MURI project (Grant No. FA9550-18-1-0379).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Xuchen Wang

358-503-097-794

@aaltouniversity

Copyright © Aalto University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Quantum Optimization: Computer scientist Yufei Ding receives NSF Early CAREER Award to advance efforts to improve quantum applications January 21st, 2021

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 First Quarter Results January 20th, 2021

Wireless/telecommunications/RF/Antennas/Microwaves

CEA-Leti and Davey Bickford Enaex Extend R&D Collaboration To Bring More Digital Solutions to Mining and Blasting Industries That Improve Safety for Workers and Increase Productivity November 17th, 2020

Turning a hot spot into a cold spot: Fano-shaped local-field responses probed by a quantum dot October 9th, 2020

Graphene detector reveals THz light's polarization October 8th, 2020

28HV Solution Accelerates GLOBALFOUNDRIES Leadership in OLED Display Drivers for Mobile Devices: With more than 75 million units shipped to leading smartphone suppliers, GFs 28HV solution is optimized to enable faster, brighter, sharper, and more power-efficient OLED displays October 1st, 2020

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Possible Futures

Quantum Optimization: Computer scientist Yufei Ding receives NSF Early CAREER Award to advance efforts to improve quantum applications January 21st, 2021

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 First Quarter Results January 20th, 2021

Discoveries

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers January 15th, 2021

Announcements

Quantum Optimization: Computer scientist Yufei Ding receives NSF Early CAREER Award to advance efforts to improve quantum applications January 21st, 2021

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 First Quarter Results January 20th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Quantum Optimization: Computer scientist Yufei Ding receives NSF Early CAREER Award to advance efforts to improve quantum applications January 21st, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Chemists invent shape-shifting nanomaterial with biomedical potential It converts from sheets to tubes and back in a controllable fashion January 13th, 2021

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19 January 8th, 2021

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

USTC develops ultrahigh-performance plasmonic metal-oxide materials January 11th, 2021

Stretching diamond for next-generation microelectronics January 5th, 2021

Research partnerships

Chemists invent shape-shifting nanomaterial with biomedical potential It converts from sheets to tubes and back in a controllable fashion January 13th, 2021

Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm January 8th, 2021

Quantum wave in helium dimer filmed for the first time: Collaboration between Goethe University and the University of Oklahoma December 30th, 2020

Understanding nanoparticle entry mechanism into tumors December 25th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project