Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles: Imaging technology offers advantages for diagnostics, other uses

Abstract:
Current state-of-the-art techniques have clear limitations when it comes to imaging the smallest nanoparticles, making it difficult for researchers to study viruses and other structures at the molecular level.

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles: Imaging technology offers advantages for diagnostics, other uses

Houston, TX | Posted on November 17th, 2020

Scientists from the University of Houston and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have reported in Nature Communications a new optical imaging technology for nanoscale objects, relying upon unscattered light to detect nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter. The technology, known as PANORAMA, uses a glass slide covered with gold nanodiscs, allowing scientists to monitor changes in the transmission of light and determine the target's characteristics.

PANORAMA takes its name from Plasmonic Nano-aperture Label-free Imaging (PlAsmonic NanO-apeRture lAbel-free iMAging), signifying the key characteristics of the technology. PANORAMA can be used to detect, count and determine the size of individual dielectric nanoparticles.

Wei-Chuan Shih, professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH and corresponding author for the paper, said the smallest transparent object a standard microscope can image is between 100 nanometers and 200 nanometers. That's mainly because - in addition to being so small - they don't reflect, absorb or "scatter" enough light, which could allow imaging systems to detect their presence.

Labeling is another commonly used technique; it requires researchers to know something about the particle they are studying - that a virus has a spike protein, for example - and engineer a way to tag that feature with fluorescent dye or some other method in order to more easily detect the particle.

"Otherwise, it will appear as invisible as a tiny dust particle under the microscope, because it's too small to detect," Shih said.

Another drawback? Labeling is only useful if researchers already know at least something about the particle they want to study.

"With PANORAMA, you don't have to do the labeling," Shih said. "You can view it directly because PANORAMA does not rely on detecting the scattered light from the nanoparticle."

Instead, the system allows observers to detect a transparent target as small as 25 nanometers by monitoring light transmission through the gold nanodisc-covered glass slide. By monitoring changes in the light, they are able to detect the nearby nanoparticles. The optical imaging system is a standard bright-field microscope commonly found in any lab. There is no need for lasers or interferometers which are required in many other label-free imaging technologies.

"The size limit has not been reached, according to the data. We stopped at 25 nm nanoparticles simply because that is the smallest polystyrene nanoparticle on the market," Shih said.

###

In addition to Shih, researchers involved in the project include Ph.D. students Nareg Ohannesian and Ibrahim Misbah, both with UH, and Dr. Steven H. Lin with the Department of Radiation Oncology at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

####

About University of Houston
The University of Houston is a Carnegie-designated Tier One public research university recognized with a Phi Beta Kappa chapter for excellence in undergraduate education. UH serves the globally competitive Houston and Gulf Coast Region by providing world-class faculty, experiential learning and strategic industry partnerships. Located in the nation's fourth-largest city and one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse regions in the country, UH is a federally designated Hispanic- and Asian-American-Serving institution with enrollment of more than 47,000 students.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jeannie Kever

713-743-0778

@UH_News

Copyright © University of Houston

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

Imaging

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces: Metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticles shown to improve resolution of fluorescence images of living cells under a widefield optical microscope to the theoretical limit November 6th, 2020

Scientists and students publish blueprints for a cheaper single-molecule microscope November 6th, 2020

Timekeeping theory combines quantum clocks and Einstein's relativity: Research reveals new time dilation phenomenon October 23rd, 2020

Possible Futures

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

Discoveries

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles: Tunable coating allows hitch-hiking nanoparticles to slip past the immune system to their target November 27th, 2020

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

Announcements

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

New insights into memristive devices by combining incipient ferroelectrics and graphene November 27th, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier: The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL research November 27th, 2020

One-way street for electrons: Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial November 27th, 2020

Tools

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces: Metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticles shown to improve resolution of fluorescence images of living cells under a widefield optical microscope to the theoretical limit November 6th, 2020

Timekeeping theory combines quantum clocks and Einstein's relativity: Research reveals new time dilation phenomenon October 23rd, 2020

Bruker Launches Advanced In-Situ Nanomechanical Test Instrument for Analyzing Materials Deformation in Electron Microscopes: Hysitron PI 89 SEM PicoIndenter Offers Unprecedented Range and Flexibility October 15th, 2020

Controlling the speed of enzyme motors brings biomedical applications of nanorobots closer: Recent advances in this field have made micro- and nanomotors promising devices for solving many biomedical problems October 13th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project