Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > 'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecule: New method presents possibilities for rapidly making and testing vaccine formulations

Evan Scott
Evan Scott

Abstract:
•Nanonet collapses to trap therapeutics inside a delivery vehicle
•New approach can capture over 95% of molecules, compared to 5% to 20% in other delivery systems
•Method could rapidly generate vaccine formulations, which require many molecules to be delivered at the same time

'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecule: New method presents possibilities for rapidly making and testing vaccine formulations

Evanston, IL | Posted on October 6th, 2020

Northwestern University researchers are casting a net for nanoparticles.



The team has discovered a new, rapid method for fabricating nanoparticles from a simple, self-assembling polymer. The novel method presents new possibilities for diverse applications, including water purification, diagnostics and rapidly generating vaccine formulations, which typically require many different types of molecules to be either captured or delivered at the same time.



Using a polymer net that collapses into nanoscale hydrogels (or nanogels), the method efficiently captures over 95% of proteins, DNA or small molecule drugs — alone or in combinations. By comparison, loading efficiency is typically between 5% and 20% for other nanoparticle delivery systems.



“We use a polymer that forms a wide net throughout an aqueous solution,” said Northwestern’s Evan A. Scott, who led the study. “Then we induce the net to collapse. It collects anything within the solution, trapping therapeutics inside of nanogel delivery vehicles with very high efficiency.”



“It works like a fishing net, which first spreads out due to electrostatic repulsion and then shrinks upon hydration to trap ‘fish,’” added Fanfan Du, a postdoctoral fellow in Scott’s laboratory.



The paper was published last week (Sept. 29) in the journal Nature Communications.



Scott is the Kay Davis Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering. Northwestern professors Monica Olvera de la Cruz and Vinayak Dravid coauthored the paper.



Molecules found in nature, such as DNA and peptides, can rapidly self-assemble and organize into diverse structures. Mimicking this process using human-made polymer systems, however, has remained limited. Previously developed processes for self-assembling drug delivery systems are time consuming, labor intensive and difficult to scale. The processes also tend to be woefully inefficient, culminating in a small fraction of the drug actually making it inside the delivery system.



“Clinical application of self-assembled nanoparticles has been limited by difficulties with scalability and with loading large or multiple therapeutics, especially proteins,” Scott said. “We present a highly scalable mechanism that can stably load nearly any therapeutic molecule with high efficiency.”



Scott’s team found success by using a polypropylene sulfone (PPSU) homopolymer, which is highly soluble in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, but forms electrostatic and hydrophilic aggregates in water. The aggregates are amphiphilic, which causes them to assemble into networks and eventually collapse into gels.



“Adding more water induces the network to collapse, leading to the formation of nanogels,” Du said. “The manner in which water is added affects the PPSU chain formation, which changes the nanogels’ size and structure.”



Atomistic simulations — performed by Baofu Qiao in the Olvera de la Cruz group — confirmed that the nanostructures were stabilized by weak sulfone-sulfone bonding. Using coarse-grained simulations performed by Northwestern postdoctoral fellow Trung Dac Nguyen, the researchers observed the nanonet structures. This opens a new avenue for soft materials assembly by means of sulfone-sulfone bonding.



In addition to drug delivery applications, the researchers also believe the novel method could be used for water purification. The network could collapse to collect contaminants in water, leaving pure water behind.



Scott is a member of Northwestern’s Simpson Querrey Institute, Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Interdisciplinary Biological Sciences Program and Northwestern University Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has a secondary appointment in the department of microbiology-immunology at the Feinberg School of Medicine.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Amanda Morris

847.467.6790

Copyright © Northwestern University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The paper, “Homopolymer self-assembly of poly(propylene sulfone) hydrogels via dynamic noncovalent sulfone-sulfone bonding,” was supported by the Department of Energy (award number DE-FG02-08ER46539), the National Institutes of Health (grant number 1DP2HL132390-01), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (grant number 5R21AI137932-02), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (grant number 1453576), the Louis A. Simpson and Kimberly K. Querrey Center for Regenerative Nanomedicine Catalyst Award and the Sherman Fairchild Foundation:

Related News Press

News and information

Deca Partners with ADTEC Engineering to Enhance Adaptive Patterning™ for 2µm Chiplet Scaling October 20th, 2020

Graphenea awarded “Best Graphene Firm” prize October 20th, 2020

Veeco Announces Aledia Order of 300mm MOCVD Equipment for microLED Displays: Propel™ Platform First 300mm System with EFEM Designed for Advanced Display Applications October 20th, 2020

Revealing the reason behind jet formation at the tip of laser optical fiber October 16th, 2020

Cancer

Secure nano-carrier delivers medications directly to cells:Nanoparticles with synthetic DNA can control release of active agents September 25th, 2020

Dipanjan Pan demonstrates new method to produce gold nanoparticles in cancer cells: Possible applications in x-ray imaging, cancer treatment September 11th, 2020

Silver-plated gold nanostars detect early cancer biomarkers: New optical sensing platform can detect genomic cancer biomarkers directly in patient tissues July 24th, 2020

Wearable patch may provide new treatment option for skin cancer June 18th, 2020

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

NSF renews Rice-based NEWT Center for water treatment: Partnership primed to introduce game-changing technologies to address global needs October 15th, 2020

New NIST project to build nano-thermometers could revolutionize temperature imaging: Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible October 9th, 2020

Graphene detector reveals THz light's polarization October 8th, 2020

Multi-institutional team extracts more energy from sunlight with advanced solar panels October 6th, 2020

Possible Futures

Deca Partners with ADTEC Engineering to Enhance Adaptive Patterning™ for 2µm Chiplet Scaling October 20th, 2020

Graphenea awarded “Best Graphene Firm” prize October 20th, 2020

Veeco Announces Aledia Order of 300mm MOCVD Equipment for microLED Displays: Propel™ Platform First 300mm System with EFEM Designed for Advanced Display Applications October 20th, 2020

Multi-state data storage leaving binary behind: Stepping 'beyond binary' to store data in more than just 0s and 1s October 16th, 2020

Nanomedicine

Octopus-inspired sucker transfers thin, delicate tissue grafts and biosensors October 16th, 2020

Controlling the speed of enzyme motors brings biomedical applications of nanorobots closer: Recent advances in this field have made micro- and nanomotors promising devices for solving many biomedical problems October 13th, 2020

New drug carrier systems: University of Delaware researchers advance drug delivery systems to treat connective tissue disorders October 9th, 2020

HKU Engineering team develops novel miniaturised organic semiconductor: An important breakthrough essential for future flexible electronic devices October 8th, 2020

Discoveries

Revealing the reason behind jet formation at the tip of laser optical fiber October 16th, 2020

Multi-state data storage leaving binary behind: Stepping 'beyond binary' to store data in more than just 0s and 1s October 16th, 2020

Octopus-inspired sucker transfers thin, delicate tissue grafts and biosensors October 16th, 2020

Controlling the speed of enzyme motors brings biomedical applications of nanorobots closer: Recent advances in this field have made micro- and nanomotors promising devices for solving many biomedical problems October 13th, 2020

Announcements

Deca Partners with ADTEC Engineering to Enhance Adaptive Patterning™ for 2µm Chiplet Scaling October 20th, 2020

Graphenea awarded “Best Graphene Firm” prize October 20th, 2020

Veeco Announces Aledia Order of 300mm MOCVD Equipment for microLED Displays: Propel™ Platform First 300mm System with EFEM Designed for Advanced Display Applications October 20th, 2020

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Accelerating Innovation in IoT and Wearables with Adaptive Body Bias Feature on 22FDX Platform October 16th, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Making disorder for an ideal battery: Manufacturing safer, more powerful batteries that use geopolitically stable resources requires solid electrolytes and replacing lithium with sodium. A chemical solution is now being offered to battery developers. October 16th, 2020

Revealing the reason behind jet formation at the tip of laser optical fiber October 16th, 2020

Multi-state data storage leaving binary behind: Stepping 'beyond binary' to store data in more than just 0s and 1s October 16th, 2020

Octopus-inspired sucker transfers thin, delicate tissue grafts and biosensors October 16th, 2020

Nanobiotechnology

Octopus-inspired sucker transfers thin, delicate tissue grafts and biosensors October 16th, 2020

Controlling the speed of enzyme motors brings biomedical applications of nanorobots closer: Recent advances in this field have made micro- and nanomotors promising devices for solving many biomedical problems October 13th, 2020

New drug carrier systems: University of Delaware researchers advance drug delivery systems to treat connective tissue disorders October 9th, 2020

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Movano Inc. Partner to Advance Needle-Free Continuous Glucose Monitoring Technology: Manufactured on GF’s 22FDX platform, Movano’s radio frequency-enabled solution will help individuals to manage their glucose levels anywhere, anytime October 1st, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project