Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums

Illinois researchers have linked electron microscope imaging and machine learning, making it much easier to study nanoparticles in action. The schematic shows how a neural network, middle, works as a bridge between liquid-phase electron microscope imaging, left, and streamlined data output, right. For more information visit, pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acscentsci.0c00430.

Graphic courtesy ACS and the Qian Chen group
Illinois researchers have linked electron microscope imaging and machine learning, making it much easier to study nanoparticles in action. The schematic shows how a neural network, middle, works as a bridge between liquid-phase electron microscope imaging, left, and streamlined data output, right. For more information visit, pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acscentsci.0c00430. Graphic courtesy ACS and the Qian Chen group

Abstract:
In the nanoworld, tiny particles such as proteins appear to dance as they transform and assemble to perform various tasks while suspended in a liquid. Recently developed methods have made it possible to watch and record these otherwise-elusive tiny motions, and researchers now take a step forward by developing a machine learning workflow to streamline the process.

Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums

Champaign, IL | Posted on August 31st, 2020

The new study, led by Qian Chen, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, builds upon her past work with liquid-phase electron microscopy and is published in the journal ACS Central Science.

Being able to see – and record – the motions of nanoparticles is essential for understanding a variety of engineering challenges. Liquid-phase electron microscopy, which allows researchers to watch nanoparticles interact inside tiny aquariumlike sample containers, is useful for research in medicine, energy and environmental sustainability and in fabrication of metamaterials, to name a few. However, it is difficult to interpret the dataset, the researchers said. The video files produced are large, filled with temporal and spatial information, and are noisy due to background signals – in other words, they require a lot of tedious image processing and analysis.

“Developing a method even to see these particles was a huge challenge,” Chen said. “Figuring out how to efficiently get the useful data pieces from a sea of outliers and noise has become the new challenge.”

To confront this problem, the team developed a machine learning workflow that is based upon an artificial neural network that mimics, in part, the learning potency of the human brain. The program builds off of an existing neural network, known as U-Net, that does not require handcrafted features or predetermined input and has yielded significant breakthroughs in identifying irregular cellular features using other types of microscopy, the study reports.

“Our new program processed information for three types of nanoscale dynamics including motion, chemical reaction and self-assembly of nanoparticles,” said lead author and graduate student Lehan Yao. “These represent the scenarios and challenges we have encountered in the analysis of liquid-phase electron microscopy videos.”

The researchers collected measurements from approximately 300,000 pairs of interacting nanoparticles, the study reports.

Click here to see liquid-phase electron microscopy with combined machine learning in action.

As found in past studies by Chen’s group, contrast continues to be a problem while imaging certain types of nanoparticles. In their experimental work, the team used particles made out of gold, which is easy to see with an electron microscope. However, particles with lower elemental or molecular weights like proteins, plastic polymers and other organic nanoparticles show very low contrast when viewed under an electron beam, Chen said.

“Biological applications, like the search for vaccines and drugs, underscore the urgency in our push to have our technique available for imaging biomolecules,“ she said. “There are critical nanoscale interactions between viruses and our immune systems, between the drugs and the immune system, and between the drug and the virus itself that must be understood. The fact that our new processing method allows us to extract information from samples as demonstrated here gets us ready for the next step of application and model systems.”

The team has made the source code for the machine learning program used in this study publicly available through the supplemental information section of the new paper. “We feel that making the code available to other researchers can benefit the whole nanomaterials research community,”Chen said.

Chen also is affiliated with chemistry, the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and the Materials Research Laboratory at the U. of I.

The National Science Foundation and Air Force Office of Scientific Research supported this study.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Qian Chen
217-300-1137

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The paper “Machine learning to reveal nanoparticle dynamics from liquid-phase TEM videos” is available online and from the U. of I. News Bureau. DOI: 10.1021/acscentsci.0c00430:

Related News Press

News and information

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Imaging

How photoblueing disturbs microscopy February 26th, 2021

Engineering the boundary between 2D and 3D materials: Cutting-edge microscope helps reveal ways to control the electronic properties of atomically thin materials February 26th, 2021

Novel Flexible Terahertz Camera Can Inspect Objects with Diverse Shapes February 17th, 2021

High-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution: The group has realized a scanless 3D imaging system and an algorithm for high-speed measurement January 29th, 2021

Nanofabrication

Bringing Atoms to a Standstill: NIST Miniaturizes Laser Cooling January January 21st, 2021

Making 3-D Nanosuperconductors with DNA: Complex 3-D nanoscale architectures based on DNA self-assembly can conduct electricity without resistance and may provide a platform for fabricating quantum computing and sensing devices November 10th, 2020

Landmark discovery could improve Army lasers, precision sensors September 29th, 2020

O-FIB: Far-field-induced near-field breakdown for direct nanowriting in an atmospheric environment March 20th, 2020

Possible Futures

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Nanomedicine

Light-emitting tattoo engineered for the first time: Scientists at UCL and the IIT -Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) have created a temporary tattoo with light-emitting technology used in TV and smartphone screens, paving the way for a new type of March 4th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files IND to Begin Phase 2b Study of ARO-APOC3 in Patients with Severe Hypertriglyceridemia March 2nd, 2021

How photoblueing disturbs microscopy February 26th, 2021

Changing the silkworm's diet to spin stronger silk February 26th, 2021

Discoveries

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Expanding the freedom of design: powder coating on FRP thanks to conductive gelcoats with graphene nanotubes March 3rd, 2021

Quantum quirk yields giant magnetic effect, where none should exist: Study opens window into the landscape of extreme topological matter March 1st, 2021

Changing the silkworm's diet to spin stronger silk February 26th, 2021

Announcements

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Built to last: New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteries: Scientists develop a novel binder material that protects the graphite anode of Li-ion batteries from degradation even after 1700 cycles March 5th, 2021

A COSMIC approach to nanoscale science: Instrument at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source achieves world-leading resolution of nanomaterials March 5th, 2021

Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminated: When indented by a probe in darkness, wafers of some semiconductors are putty-like. When illuminated by light whose wavelength matches the band gap, they become hard, as electrons and holes freed by March 5th, 2021

Taking 2D materials for a spin: Scientists at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of High Pressure Physics fabricate a novel molybdenum disulfide transistor and create an image of the spins of the electrons passing through which may open the way for new spintronic compute March 5th, 2021

Tools

From microsaws to nanodrills: laser pulses act as subtle machining tools: Industrial-grade materials processing on the sub-micron scale is enabled by spatially structured ultrashort laser pulses February 26th, 2021

Engineering the boundary between 2D and 3D materials: Cutting-edge microscope helps reveal ways to control the electronic properties of atomically thin materials February 26th, 2021

Novel Flexible Terahertz Camera Can Inspect Objects with Diverse Shapes February 17th, 2021

CEA Is the First Research Center to Acquire A Cryogenic Prober for Testing Quantum Bits February 10th, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project