Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Scientists tame Josephson vortices

Experimental setup. The blue and orange indicate niobium and copper, respectively. The ellipse marks the area of ??the Josephson junction. The cobalt-chromium-coated tip oscillates, excited by a piezo element (dither). The optic fiber is used to read out the oscillations

CREDIT
Viacheslav Dremov et al./Nature Communications
Experimental setup. The blue and orange indicate niobium and copper, respectively. The ellipse marks the area of ??the Josephson junction. The cobalt-chromium-coated tip oscillates, excited by a piezo element (dither). The optic fiber is used to read out the oscillations CREDIT Viacheslav Dremov et al./Nature Communications

Abstract:
MIPT physicists have learned how to locally control Josephson vortices. The discovery can be used for quantum electronics superconducting devices and future quantum processors. The work has been published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications.

Scientists tame Josephson vortices

Moscow, Russia | Posted on November 1st, 2019

A Josephson vortex is a vortex of currents occurring in a system of two superconductors separated by a weak link -- a dielectric, a normal metal, etc. -- in the presence of an external magnetic field. In 1962, Brian Josephson predicted the flow of a supercurrent through a thin layer of insulating material separating two pieces of superconducting material. This current was named the Josephson current, and the coupling of superconductors was dubbed a Josephson junction. A so-called weak link occurs between the two superconductors through a dielectric or a nonsuperconducting metal, and macroscopic quantum coherence develops.

When this system is placed in a magnetic field, the superconductors push the magnetic field out. The greater the magnetic field applied, the more the superconductivity resists the magnetic field penetrating into the Josephson system. However, the weak link is a place in which the field can penetrate in the form of individual Josephson vortices carrying magnetic flux quanta. Josephson vortices are often seen as real topological objects, 2 pi-phase singularities that are hard to observe and manipulate.

Researchers from the MIPT Laboratory of Topological Quantum Phenomena in Superconducting Systems applied a magnetic force microscope to study Josephson vortices in a system of two superconducting niobium contacts interlaid with a copper layer acting as a weak link.

"We have demonstrated that in the planar (flat) superconductor-normal metal-superconductor contacts, Josephson vortices have a unique imprint," said the paper's senior author, Vasily Stolyarov of MIPT. "We found this by observing these structures with a magnetic force microscope. Based on this discovery, we demonstrated the possibility of locally generating Josephson vortices, which can be manipulated by the magnetic cantilever of a microscope. Our research is yet another step toward creating future superconducting quantum computing machines."

The variety of ultrasensitive superconducting devices, qubits, and architectures for quantum computing is growing rapidly. It is expected that superconducting quantum electronic devices will challenge conventional semiconductor devices very soon. These new devices will rely on Josephson junctions like the one indicated by the yellow closed arrow in figure 1.

"It is quite difficult to visualize Josephson vortices, as they are poorly localized," Stolyarov added. "We discovered a way to measure the dissipation that occurs during the creation and destruction of such a vortex in the weak link area. Dissipation is a minor release of energy. In our case, the energy is released when a vortex moves in a planar Josephson contact. Thus, using our magnetic force microscope, we can successfully detect not only the static magnetic portrait of the superconducting structure but also the dynamic processes in it."

The authors of the paper demonstrated a method for remote generation, detection, and manipulation of Josephson vortices in planar Josephson junctions using a low-temperature magnetic force microscope. With certain parameters (probe location, temperature, external magnetic field, electric current flow through the sample), the team observed a particular response of the microscope cantilever. This was followed by the appearance of sharp rings/arcs in the images. The researchers identified these features as bifurcation points between adjacent Josephson states characterized by a different number or position of Josephson vortices inside the junction. The process is accompanied by the exchange of energy between the cantilever and the sample at the bifurcation points and demonstrates that a magnetic force microscope can provide unique information on the state of a Josephson vortex.

It is expected that the results of the research will serve as an impetus and a basis for developing new methods of local noncontact diagnostics and management of modern superconducting devices and superconducting quantum electronics.

###

The study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation and the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Varvara Bogomolova

7-916-147-4496

@phystech_en

Copyright © Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Arrowhead and Collaborator Janssen Present Phase 2 Clinical Data for Investigational Hepatitis B Regimens at The Liver Meeting® 2019 November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Quantum Physics

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Structured light promises path to faster, more secure communications: Quantum mechanics is embracing patterns of light to create an alphabet that can be leveraged to build a light-based quantum network November 6th, 2019

Quantum supremacy milestone harnesses ORNL Summit supercomputer October 25th, 2019

Magnetism

Sponge-like 2D material with interesting electrical conductivity and magnetic properties: Researchers synthesize a new 2D Metal Organic Framework with an ever-growing list of possible applications October 31st, 2019

Small magnets reveal big secrets: Work by international research team could have wide-ranging impact on information technology applications October 28th, 2019

Magnets sustainably separate mixtures of rare earth metals October 25th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Argonne collaborates to review current battery recycling processes for electric vehicles November 8th, 2019

Go with the flow: Scientists design new grid batteries for renewable energy: New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind November 8th, 2019

Possible Futures

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Chip Technology

Electrifying science: New study describes conduction through proteins November 1st, 2019

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

Combination of Nanometrics and Rudolph Technologies to Create Onto Innovation October 16th, 2019

PROPHESEE Joins IRT Nanoelec 3D Integration Program Will Work with CEA-Leti, STMicroelectronics, Mentor, EVG, and SET to Develop New 3D Event-Based Vision System October 14th, 2019

Quantum Computing

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover a new high-temperature superconductor November 8th, 2019

Small magnets reveal big secrets: Work by international research team could have wide-ranging impact on information technology applications October 28th, 2019

Quantum supremacy milestone harnesses ORNL Summit supercomputer October 25th, 2019

Discoveries

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover a new high-temperature superconductor November 8th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Announcements

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2019 Year End Results November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Scientists probe the limits of ice: Transition between ice and liquid water gets fuzzy at the nanoscale November 9th, 2019

Self-assembled microspheres of silica to cool surfaces without energy consumption November 8th, 2019

Arrowhead and Collaborator Janssen Present Phase 2 Clinical Data for Investigational Hepatitis B Regimens at The Liver Meeting® 2019 November 8th, 2019

Quantum nanoscience

A distinct spin on atomic transport: Work that demonstrates simultaneous control over transport and spin properties of cold atoms establishes a framework for exploring concepts of spintronics and solid-state physics November 8th, 2019

Extracting hidden quantum information from a light source October 25th, 2019

CCNY physicists score double hit in LED research September 27th, 2019

Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues: Nanolaser has potential to treat neurological disorders or sense disease biomarkers September 23rd, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project