Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought: Non-antibacterial nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria

Chemist Erin Carlson led research showing that nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria.

Credit: Patrick O'Leary, University of Minnesota
Chemist Erin Carlson led research showing that nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria. Credit: Patrick O'Leary, University of Minnesota

Abstract:
Over the last two decades, nanotechnology has improved many everyday products, from microelectronics to sunscreens. Nanoparticles (particles just a few hundred atoms in size) are ending up in the environment by the ton, but scientists are still unclear about the long-term effects of these super-small particles.

Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought: Non-antibacterial nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria

Alexandria, VA | Posted on October 17th, 2019

In a first-of-its-kind study, published in Chemical Science, researchers have shown that nanoparticles may have a bigger impact on the environment than previously thought.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota, through the National Science Foundation Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology, found that a common, non-disease-causing bacterium in the environment, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, developed rapid resistance when repeatedly exposed to nanoparticles used in making lithium ion batteries, the rechargeable batteries used in portable electronics and electric vehicles. The resistance means that the fundamental biochemistry and biology of the bacteria are changing.

The results of the study are unusual, the researchers say. Bacterial resistance usually occurs because bacteria become resistant to attempts to kill them. In this case, the nanoparticles used in lithium ion batteries were not intended to kill bacteria. This is the first report of non-antibacterial nanoparticles causing resistance in bacteria.

Bacteria are prevalent in lakes and soil where there is a delicate balance of organisms. Other organisms feed on the microbes, and the resistant bacteria could have effects scientists can't yet predict.

"Research that advances technology and sustains our environment is a priority for the Division of Chemistry," said Michelle Bushey, program director for the NSF Chemical Centers for Innovation Program. "This work reveals the unexplored and long-term impacts some nanoparticles have on the living organisms around us. This discovery at the chemistry-biology interface is a first step toward developing new sustainable materials and practices and providing the groundwork for possible remediation approaches."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
NSF Public Affairs, (703) 292-7090

Copyright © National Science Foundation

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Article:

Related News Press

News and information

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 First Quarter Results January 20th, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light January 15th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Researchers realize efficient generation of high-dimensional quantum teleportation January 14th, 2021

Possible Futures

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 First Quarter Results January 20th, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Discoveries

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers January 15th, 2021

Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation January 15th, 2021

Announcements

CEA-Leti Reports Machine-Learning Breakthrough That Opens Way to Edge Learning: Article in Nature Electronics Details Method that Takes Advantage of RRAM Non-Idealities To Create Intelligent Systems that Have Potential Medical-Diagnostic Applications January 20th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Webcast Fiscal 2021 First Quarter Results January 20th, 2021

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors January 19th, 2021

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times: University of Minnesota study opens up possibilities for new transparent materials that conduct electricity January 15th, 2021

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life: A team of theoretical physicists from the University of Trento has shown that it is possible to use quantum computers to simulate processes of great biological importance, such as changes in the shape of protein January 15th, 2021

Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound: Scientists show ultrasonication is a cost-effective approach to enhance the properties of magnesium diboride superconductors January 15th, 2021

Safety-Nanoparticles/Risk management

No nanoparticle risks to humans found in field tests of spray sunscreens December 2nd, 2020

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles: Due to its antibacterial properties, nanosilver is used in a wide range of products from textiles to cosmetics; but nanosilver if present at high concentrations also disrupts the metabolism of algae that are essential for the aquatic food November 27th, 2020

Study: Nanoparticles produced from burning coal result in damage to mice lungs, suggesting toxicity to humans February 5th, 2020

NIOSH requests data to help develop exposure limits for nanomaterials February 1st, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project