Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > New materials to help stop lithium-ion battery fires, explosions and improve battery performance

Purdue University scientists have come up with patented techniques that may cut down the fire risk from lithium-ion batteries, which are found in everyday electronic devices. (Stock photo)
Purdue University scientists have come up with patented techniques that may cut down the fire risk from lithium-ion batteries, which are found in everyday electronic devices. (Stock photo)

Abstract:
From automobiles and planes to laptops and e-bikes, lithium-ion batteries have been blamed for causing fires in high-tech devices. Now, Purdue University scientists have come up with patented techniques that may cut down the risk from these popular batteries, which are found in everyday devices such as phones and tablets.

New materials to help stop lithium-ion battery fires, explosions and improve battery performance

West Lafayette, IN | Posted on October 2nd, 2019

“The major problem that hinders the wider implementation of these batteries into more automobiles and other larger devices is the flammable and explosive nature of the liquid electrolyte materials used in their fabrication,” said Ernesto E. Marinero, a professor of materials engineering and electrical and computer engineering in Purdue’s College of Engineering. “These liquids are used in what constitutes the highway, the electrolyte, for shuttling reversibly lithium ions between the battery electrodes during charge and discharge cycles.”

Marinero said the Purdue research team created solutions that address the flammability problem, along with the need for high plasticity in the material inside the battery that connects the anode and cathode electrodes.

Purdue scientists created a novel composite solid-state electrolyte material system comprising ceramic nanoparticles embedded in polymer matrixes.

“These patented technologies are designed to provide a safer path within the battery and increase the ionic conductivity and performance,” Marinero said. “In addition, these composite materials potentially enable the use of pure lithium metal anodes, to increment the volumetric capacity density of existing batteries by a factor of about five.”

Marinero said the Purdue innovations have applications beyond automobiles and personal electronic devices. The battery technology also can help improve the function and lifetime of medical devices such as pacemakers.

Andres Villa, a doctoral research assistant who works in Marinero’s laboratory, studied the effects of various materials on the ionic conductivity. He found that less than 10% per weight of ceramic nanoparticles in a polymer composite electrolyte are needed to surpass the ionic conductivity of thin films comprising only the ceramic material, thereby significantly cutting down production costs.

Marinero and his team worked with scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory and the Battery Innovation Center on their technologies.

The technologies developed by Marinero and his team have been patented through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. The researchers are looking for partners to further test and commercialize their technology. For more information on licensing this Purdue innovation, contact D.H.R. Sarma at the Office of Technology Commercialization at

The work aligns with Purdue's Giant Leaps celebration of the university’s global advancements in sustainability and health as part of Purdue’s 150th anniversary. Those are two of the four themes of the yearlong celebration’s Ideas Festival, designed to showcase Purdue as an intellectual center solving real-world issues.

####

About Purdue University
About Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization

The Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization operates one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the U.S. Services provided by this office support the economic development initiatives of Purdue University and benefit the university's academic activities through commercializing, licensing and protecting Purdue intellectual property. The office is managed by the Purdue Research Foundation, which received the 2016 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Innovation from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Visit the Office of Technology Commercialization for more information.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Writer: Chris Adam, 765-588-3341,

Source: Ernesto Marinero,

Copyright © Purdue University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Hosts R&D Day on Emerging Pipeline of RNAi Therapeutics October 18th, 2019

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Highest-throughput 3D printer is future of manufacturing: Rapid manufacturing on-demand could put warehouses, molds into the past October 17th, 2019

Possible Futures

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Highest-throughput 3D printer is future of manufacturing: Rapid manufacturing on-demand could put warehouses, molds into the past October 17th, 2019

Nanomedicine

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Hosts R&D Day on Emerging Pipeline of RNAi Therapeutics October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

SUNY Poly Receives $75,000 National Science Foundation Award for Development of Bioengineered and Improved Blood Thinner: Grant is Part of Collaboration with TEGA Therapeutics, Inc. Supporting Research Leading to Engineered Cells and Production of a Scalable Heparin Product October 8th, 2019

Discoveries

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Highest-throughput 3D printer is future of manufacturing: Rapid manufacturing on-demand could put warehouses, molds into the past October 17th, 2019

Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought: Non-antibacterial nanoparticles can cause resistance in bacteria October 17th, 2019

Announcements

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Poly’s CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Hosts R&D Day on Emerging Pipeline of RNAi Therapeutics October 18th, 2019

How perovskite in solar cells recrystallizes and why modified carbon nanotubes can help overcome the reproducibility problem by making use of this October 18th, 2019

Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity: New approach for studying neural circuits offers advantages over both microelectrodes and fluorescence-based optical techniques that require genetic modifications October 18th, 2019

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Highest-throughput 3D printer is future of manufacturing: Rapid manufacturing on-demand could put warehouses, molds into the past October 17th, 2019

MIT engineers develop 'blackest black' material to date: Made from carbon nanotubes, the new coating is 10 times darker than other very black materials September 13th, 2019

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Files Patent Infringement Lawsuits Against TSMC In the U.S. and Germany: Injunctions seek to prevent unlawful importation of infringing Taiwanese semiconductors August 26th, 2019

A first for cancer research’: New approach to study tumors August 20th, 2019

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

Do you Kyoto? World-leading companies share their approaches to environmentally friendly business at NAUM’19 October 14th, 2019

Borophene on silver grows freely into an atomic ‘skin’: Rice scientists lead effort to improve manufacture of valuable 2D material October 1st, 2019

Turning heat into electricity: A new thermoelectric material developed at FEFU: Young scientists from FEFU manufactured new thermoelectric material based on strontium titanate and titanium oxide September 27th, 2019

'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time September 20th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project